To Your Kitchen From Mine by Betty Newton

to your kitchen from mine

YOU ARE WISE …

to choose a Modern GAS range because it will give you the best cooking results possible while adding new beauty and convenience to your kitchen. It is designed for long life and the easy care that is so necessary in today’s living.

The tips on range use and care can keep your range cooking perfectly and looking its best for years to come. This booklet is a collection of some of our most popular recipes. Each one has been carefully tested in our kitchen—we hope they’ll be favorites in your kitchen, too.

Call your GAS Company when necessary to check the temperature and to make any range adjustments. There is no charge for this service.

Please call me if I can help you. It is always a pleasure to talk with you about your GAS appliances.

Home Economist
YOUR GAS COMPAN

CONTENTS
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CARE AND CLEANING
Cook Top7
Oven7
Broiler8
Accessories8
Cleaning Chart9
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TOP OF RANGE
Top Burners10
A Thought or Two About a Pot or Two11
A Guide for Using the “Burner-With-A-Brain”13
Recipes for “Burner-With-A-Brain”17
Griddle20
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OVEN
Blue Flame Oven Tips22
Use of Aluminum Foil22
Meat Probe23
Meat and Poultry Roasting Guide24
Recipes for Oven26
Low-Temperature Oven Control28
Keep-Warm Temperatures For Oven-Cooked Foods30
Keep-Warm Temperatures For Top-Burner-Cooked Foods31
To Thaw Frozen Foods31
Programmed Cooking32
Programmed Oven Meals34
Secrets of Better Baking38
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BROILER
General Broiling Tips40
Infrared Broiling Guide41
Reheating Food in the Infrared Broiler42
Conventional Broiling Guide For Other Foods42
Broiler Recipes43
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ROTISSERIE
Rotisserie Tips45
Conventional Burner Rotisserie Guide46
Infrared Burner Rotisserie Guide47
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KITCHEN TALK
Cooking Terms and Methods48
Measuring the Right Way49
Common Can and Jar Sizes50
Substituting Ingredients51
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CARE AND CLEANING

You will find that your Gas Range is as easy to care for as it is to use. The following suggestions will help keep it looking—and cooking—like new. Remember, good care means longer wear and maximum good service from any household appliance.

AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION:
1. Use correct flame size. A flame which is too high will cause spattering and spillovers. Also, avoid overfilling utensils.

2. Before putting utensils into the oven or on a surface burner, be sure outside of pan is thoroughly clean.

3. Time cooking operations properly, and use CORRECT TEMPERATURES for roasting, baking and thermostatic top burner cooking. This will not only give you better cooking results, but also eliminate the possibility of spillovers and hard-to-clean pans.

4. A little care regularly keeps a range like new and is much easier than waiting until stains are cooked on and a major cleaning job is necessary. All surfaces can safely be washed with detergent and hot water. To retain the original appearance, RINSE and wipe surfaces dry after washing.

5. To keep the fine porcelain enamel and polished metal finishes free of scratches, avoid the use of gritty, harsh cleansers and abrasives which in time take away the shiny new finish.

6. If acid foods such as fruit juices, vinegar, coffee, tea or milk are spilled on the range, wipe them off immediately to guard against permanent discoloration of the finish.

7. Never place extremely hot utensils on the porcelain finished areas.

THE POUND OF CURE:
1. If there is a spillover when the range is warm, wipe off with a dry cloth or paper towel. After the range is cool, finish cleaning with warm water and a mild soap, or wash with a solution of 3 tablespoons baking soda dissolved in 1 quart of warm water. Rinse in clear warm water and dry with soft cloth.

2. Never scrape surfaces with a sharp object such as a knife or razor blade. In most cases, ordinary stains can be removed from the range with baking soda and a damp cloth. If the stain proves to be stubborn, use a mild cleanser such as Bon-Ami, Bab-O, or similar cleansers.

3. In most cases, a damp cloth will wipe the chrome surface clean. Use any one of the many good chrome cleaners if the stains prove to be stubborn.

4. All removable parts (except aluminum) will clean more easily if soaked in ammonia and hot water (4 tablespoons to 2 quarts) for a few hours.

5. If food spills over in the oven, sprinkle with salt to stop smoke and odor. Clean as soon as finished baking. Failure to do so may result in a permanently pitted surface.

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COOK TOP
BURNERS
Burners can be wiped off without removing them from the range. However, they are removable for an occasional thorough washing in a solution of detergent water. Remove stubborn spots with a damp cloth and baking soda. They may be placed in an inverted position in a warm oven to be dried. It is not necessary to boil burners. Be sure to fit burners securely back into place.

BURNER PORTS
To clean top burner ports, use a pipe cleaner which has been dipped in ammonia or a wire, such as a straightened out paper clip rather than a toothpick which could break off and further clog the ports.

THERMOSTATIC SENSING DEVICE
Cooking is carefree and accurate if the sensing device of the thermostatic top burner is kept clean. Simply wipe with a damp cloth or remove stubborn spots with SOAPLESS, fine steel wool. Generally the sensing devices do not lift out, however, there are exceptions. Refer to your range manufacturer’s manual for specific instructions.

BURNER BOWLS, GRIDS, DRIP TRAYS
Burner bowls, grids and drip trays can be removed for washing at the sink. Wash with mild detergent and hot water. If especially soiled, soak in a solution of hot ammonia water. Remove stubborn spots with a damp cloth and baking soda.

BURNER CONTROL
Burner control knobs are removable. Be sure control is in OFF position before removing knob. If knobs do not remove easily, slide a dish towel or cloth under the edge of the knob; encircle the knob and pull. Wash with mild detergent and hot water.

OVEN
OVEN INTERIOR
The oven interior and all removable parts clean much easier if a small dish of undiluted household ammonia is allowed to stand in it for several hours or overnight prior to washing. In most cases, cleaning can be completed with hot soapy water. Baking soda or a mild cleanser can be used on stubborn spots and stains. Soap filled steel wool pads may be used if well moistened and used gently.

Teflon-lined oven: Refer to range manufacturer’s instruction booklet.

OVEN WINDOWS
Oven windows are not removable in most ranges. Wash in place with mild detergent and water or a solution of baking soda and water (3 tablespoons to 1 cup water).

OVEN DOORS
Oven doors are removable on some ranges for easy cleaning. Also, once removed, access to the oven interior is easy. Refer to your range manufacturer’s manual regarding this feature.

OVEN BOTTOM
The oven bottom and oven racks are easily removed for cleaning at the sink in mild detergent and water. If necessary, clean with fine steel wool pads, rinse well and wipe dry. Be sure to replace in correct position for even heat distribution.

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MEAT PROBE
A meat probe should not be immersed in water when cleaned. Wipe with a damp cloth.

A meat probe is a delicate instrument which should not be abused. When disconnecting the probe after cooking, grasp the plug on one end and the solid part of the probe on the other end. DO NOT PULL ON THE CABLE AT ANY TIME.

Also, the meat probe should not be stored in the oven or other parts of the range. Since the probe could become defective if it is exposed to 350 degrees or over, it should be stored at room temperature.

BROILER
Broiler pan cleaning can be minimized by removing the broiler pan BEFORE preheating broiler compartment. Cold food placed on a hot broiler pan will stick before it is placed in the broiler. After food is cooked, remove it AND the broiler pan from broiler compartment. Drippings will bake on the broiler pan if left in a hot broiler compartment. As soon as food has been removed from the broiler pan pour off grease. Sprinkle pan and insert with soap powder or liquid detergent and cover with a hot damp cloth or wet paper towels. Drippings will steam and loosen while the meal is being served. A soapy fine steel wool pad may also be used if needed. Do not cover broiler pan insert with aluminum foil during broiling. Grease MUST be allowed to drip through the broiler pan insert into the lower pan away from the heat.

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ACCESSORIES
ROTISSERIE
Rotisserie with burner above food: Use broiler pan without insert as a drip pan. Keep at least ½ inch of water in pan to eliminate spattering of basting sauces and to aid cleaning.

Rotisserie with indirect heat from oven burner: Water in the rotisserie pan is not recommended when using this type rotisserie. Since the water is between the food and the burner—there is too much steaming. Instead, crumple aluminum foil and place in rotisserie pan to catch drippings and help reduce spattering.

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GRIDDLE
To keep a gleaming griddle, turn off the flame when cooking is finished and wipe the surface with paper towels. When cool, wash with hot soapy water (not synthetic detergent), rinse and dry thoroughly. Avoid using a soda or alkaline cleaner.

To preserve the finish of the griddle never scrape it with knives or other sharp objects.

Overheating or sudden temperature changes can damage a griddle.

Teflon: Refer to manufacturer’s instructions.

LIGHT BULBS
If oven light needs replacing, buy a 40 watt Heat Resistant lamp (not an ordinary light bulb). Turn light switch to OFF position, cover old lamp with a dry cloth and unscrew; replace with new one. When cleaning, do not touch hot lamp with a wet cloth; it may break.

CLEANING CHART
MATERIAL OR FINISH RANGE PART TO REMOVE SOIL
Porcelain Enamel Cook Top
Door and Side Panels
Burner Grids
Burner Bowls Detergent OR baking soda (3 Tbsp. to 1 qt. water) and hot water
Oven Interiors
Broiler Pan Detergent OR ammonia and hot water
Broiler Compartment Interior Soap filled steel wool pad with plenty of water
Oven Racks and Guides Ammonia Solution (½ C. to 1 gal. water)
Chrome Burner Bowls
Oven Interior
Handles Detergent and hot water or chrome polish
Aluminum Burner Caps
Trim Detergent and hot water, soapy fine steel wool pad, or aluminum cleaner. Dry aluminum parts fairly rapidly. To prevent darkening, do not soak.
Glass, Plastic and Enamel Paint Back Panel
Oven Window
Burner Control Knob
Range Bottom Detergent and hot water only; rinse well and polish dry.
Stainless Steel or Brushed Chrome Doors
Range Tops Full strength ammonia OR full strength liquid all-purpose cleaner with ammonia; rinse well and polish dry.
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TOP OF RANGE
TOP BURNERS
Gas burners provide a thousand and one shades of heat from high to very low to suit every cooking need. Heat is supplied instantly, and there is no leftover heat when the burner is turned off. To use the burner, turn the burner control until the burner ignites; then turn to adjust the flame size. Some burners have audible “clicks” to indicate heat settings.

FLAME SIZE
Correct flame size is determined by pan size, pan material, what you are cooking and whether you are cooking with liquid. Even when cooking in a liquid or with a pan which conducts heat well, you may want to lower the flame to adjust for pan size (see sketch below). The flame should never extend beyond the outer edge of the utensil. Any higher flame is wasted heat.

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For all cooking in aluminum utensils or for cooking in liquid in other utensils, adjust the flame so it touches the pan about ½ inch from the outer edge.

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For non-aluminum pans (unless you are cooking in liquid) adjust the flame so it is about half the diameter of the pan.

Foods cook just as quickly at a gentle boil as at a rapid rolling boil—in both cases the water temperature is 212 degrees. A high boil is used only to bring food to the boiling point; then lower the flame and finish cooking with a minimum flame.

EXCESS HEAT RESULTS IN HARD-TO-CLEAN GREASE AND STEAM DEPOSITS ON WALLS, CABINETS AND CEILINGS. WHILE THE FUEL IS OFTEN BLAMED FOR SUCH DIRT, THE REAL PROBLEM IS TOO MUCH HEAT AND/OR FAILURE TO COVER UTENSILS WHENEVER POSSIBLE.

HIGH FLAME
For instant heat needed to bring foods to a rapid boil.

MEDIUM FLAME
To brown and fry food.

SIMMER FLAME
To maintain gentle boil for boiling or steaming, cream sauces, gravies, puddings, etc.

KEEP WARM
To keep foods hot without additional cooking; melting and keeping hot beverages at serving temperature. Always cover utensils with this setting.

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FLAME ADJUSTMENT
Of all its advantages, the cleanliness of GAS is perhaps the greatest. A properly adjusted Gas flame is one of the cleanest energy sources known.

The color of the flame is the key to proper burner adjustment. A good flame is clear and blue and hardly visible in a well lighted room. Each cone of flame should be steady and sharply defined.

A THOUGHT OR TWO ABOUT A POT OR TWO
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Cooking is easier with the correct pan; a well designed pan. Look for these characteristics when selecting new pans:

GOOD BALANCE
aids even heating and ease of use. The pan should set level with or without food.

WELL FITTED COVER
helps to retain moisture, flavor and nutrients during the cooking process. It keeps temperature in the pan more even and holds in heat, aroma, and steam. Cover pans whenever you can so foods cook with maximum speed and minimum clean-up. Cooking with a cover will require a lower flame setting than will be needed for the same food cooked uncovered.

HEAT-RESISTANT HANDLE
aids in easy handling of the utensil and avoids discomfort or burn.

DENT-RESISTANT MATERIAL
aids in retaining the original shape of the pan to insure good lid fit and ease in cleaning.

GOOD HEAT CONDUCTOR MATERIAL
insures more even heating of the pan and more even browning or cooking. Examples of good heat conducting materials are: aluminum or aluminum-clad stainless steel. Materials which conduct heat slowly (stainless steel, cast iron, glass and enamel) may require special attention for desired results. GENERALLY, LOWER FLAME HEIGHTS ARE BEST FOR NON-ALUMINUM UTENSILS.

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COOKING ON THE “BURNER-WITH-A-BRAIN”
THERMOSTATIC TOP BURNER WITH FLAME SIZE CONTROL
This new flexible control permits you to cook automatically in utensils of many types and sizes. Temperature is thermostatically controlled by a sensing device in the center of the burner. The sensing device, in contact with the pan bottom, transmits food temperature to a thermostat which maintains any degree of heat you select, automatically.

The flame size control is an added convenience to permit easy adjustment of the height of the flame on the burner. The size of flame should be selected to fit the size or type of cooking utensil, or the kind of food or cooking to be done. A low size flame is best for small utensils, for non-aluminum pans (stainless steel, cast iron, glass and enamel), and foods requiring a temperature of 200 degrees or below.

TIMED OR PROGRAMMED TOP BURNER
Some thermostatic top burners are available which can be set to cook at any temperature, then AUTOMATICALLY reduce to a holding temperature. For details, refer to manufacturer’s instruction booklet.

ADVANTAGES OF “BURNER-WITH-A-BRAIN” COOKING:
1. Food is better because each food can be cooked at the most desirable, accurate temperature.

2. Cooking is more carefree because the temperature selected is maintained automatically. Burning, scorching, boil-overs and pot-watching are eliminated.

3. After cooking the food can be held on the “LOW” setting when there are unavoidable delays at serving time. Even mashed potatoes will stay hot and fluffy without scorching!

4. Results are excellent when doing special types of cooking such as deep fat frying, griddle cooking, warming leftovers, popcorn, skillet meals, and sensitive foods such as custards and cream sauces because it assures even, accurate temperature control.

BEST RESULTS:
1. Use flat bottomed utensils which make good contact with the sensing device. Try also to choose pans that fit the quantity of food you are cooking. Utensils perform best when nearly full.

2. Aluminum conducts heat very well and is ideal for use on the thermostatic top burner.

3. Do not use glass utensils unless food is cooked in liquid.

4. The top of the sensing device and the bottom of the utensil should be kept clean.

5. In frying foods, particularly meats, make certain that the center of the pan over the sensing device is covered with food.

6. Generally, lower flame heights are best for non-aluminum utensils.

7. When meats with bones are pan broiled and insufficient fat is obtained 13from the meat, it may be necessary to add a small amount of shortening to insure good contact between pan and meat.

8. Frying in pyroceram (Corningware) requires low flame size and 25 to 50 degrees lower temperature.

9. When cakes, breads or desserts are baked on the thermostatic top burner, the top of the food has a slightly steamed appearance. Remove cover for last 5 minutes to allow food to dry on top.

10. Preheating is necessary when pan frying, deep fat frying, pan broiling and griddle cooking. Put the shortening in the pan (except for pan broiling) and set the thermostatic control at the flame size and temperature recommended for the food being cooked. When the temperature is reached, the flame will automatically lower or diminish completely and you can begin to fry then or whenever you are ready. The burner will automatically increase or decrease the flame as needed to maintain the selected temperature.

11. Tight-fitting lids keep heat, moisture and flavor inside the pan and should be used for warming, melting, simmering, steaming and most boiling. Cooking without a cover will require a higher temperature setting than will be needed for the same food cooked covered. Frying and pan broiling do not require covers.

12. It may be helpful to record the temperature settings which give you the best results.

TIME AND TEMPERATURE GUIDE FOR
“BURNER-WITH-A-BRAIN”
Personal taste, the quantity of food and other factors may necessitate a slightly higher or lower temperature. Reduce flame size for all small utensils before selecting temperature and for nonaluminum pans (stainless steel, cast iron, glass and enamel). To fry in pyroceram (Corningware) utensils, lower temperature 25 degrees to 50 degrees.

ALUMINUM IS THE BEST HEAT CONDUCTOR AND IS IDEAL FOR USE ON THERMOSTATIC TOP BURNER.

CONTROL SETTING
FOOD TEMPERATURE APPROXIMATE COOKING TIME
BEVERAGES
Cocoa 175°-200° 10 to 15 Min.
Coffee
Percolator 225°-250° 12 to 15 Min.
Vacuum 185° 8 to 10 Min.
To Keep Warm 150°-175°
BREADS
Grilled Sandwiches 325°-350° 2 to 3 Min. per side
French Toast 325°-350° 3 to 4 Min. per side
Pancakes 350°-375° 1 to 3 Min. per side
CAKES
(Bake in 10-inch skillet, covered)
Gingerbread 250° 30 to 35 Min.
Package Cake, 1 layer 250° 25 to 30 Min.
Pineapple Upside-down Cake, 1 layer 250° 25 to 30 Min.
CANDY
(Use a heavy pan, preferably aluminum)
Fudge 250° To soft ball stage on candy thermometer
Divinity 250° To hard ball stage on candy thermometer
Peanut Brittle 325°-350° 15 to 20 Min. or hard cracked stage on candy thermometer
CEREAL
(added to boiling water)
Cream of Wheat (quick) 175°-200° 5 Min.
Oatmeal (quick) 175°-200° 3 to 5 Min.
Macaroni, Spaghetti and Noodles 225°-250° Until tender
Rice 210°-225° 20 Min.
DESSERTS
Custards:
Soft (stirred) 175°-190° 4 to 7 Min.
Steamed, individual 175°-190° 20 to 30 Min.
Puddings:
Cream Pie Filling 200°-210° 6 to 8 Min.
Package Mix 200° 4 to 8 Min.
Steamed, 1-qt. mold 200° According to recipe
Tapioca 200° 5 to 8 Min.
EGGS
Fried 200°-225° 2 to 4 Min. preheated skillet
Omelet 250°-300° 3 to 5 Min.
Poached 175°-200° 3 to 7 Min., covered
Hard Cooked 200° 20 Min., covered
Soft Cooked
(Added to boiling water) 200°-225° 3 to 6 Min.
Scrambled 200°-225° 2 to 4 Min. preheated skillet
FRUITS
Applesauce 200° 15 to 20 Min., covered
Cranberry Sauce 225° 15 to 20 Min.
Dried Fruits, 1 lb. 190°-200° 15 to 35 Min.
FROSTINGS
(Use heavy pan, preferably aluminum)
Boiled 250°-275° 8 to 10 Min. or long thread
Fudge or Caramel 250°-275° 12 to 14 Min. or soft ball
Seven Minute 190°-200° 3 to 10 Min.
JAM AND JELLY
Jam, 3 to 4 lb., fruit 225° According to recipe
Jelly, 2 cups juice 250° Until jelly “sheets″
FISH, MEAT AND POULTRY
Bacon (do not preheat pan) 300°-325° 3 to 5 Min. per side
Braised Meat 350° Until brown
210° Until tender
Canadian Bacon 275°-300° 2 to 5 Min. per side
Chicken, cut up 325° Until brown
210°-225° 20 to 40 Min., covered
Fish Fillets 325° 4 to 5 Min. per side
Ground Beef Patties 300°-325° 4 to 6 Min. per side
Ham Slice, ¼″ to ½″ thick 300° 6 to 8 Min. per side
Liver, ¼″ to ½″ thick 275° 3 to 5 Min. per side
Pork Chops, ½″ to 1″ thick 275° Until brown
200° 20 to 40 Min., covered
Pork Sausage 275° Until thoroughly cooked
Pot Roast, 3 to 5 lb. 325° Until brown
200°-215° 3 to 4 Hr., covered
Steak, Cube 350° 2 Min. per side for medium doneness
Steak, Sirloin, Club, T-Bone or Rib ½″ to ¾″ thick 325° 3 to 7 Min. per side for medium doneness
SAUCES
(Cook uncovered, stirring constantly)
Barbecue Sauce 210° 15 Min.
Gravy 200°-225° 5 to 8 Min.
White Sauce 200°-210° 4 to 6 Min.
SOUPS
(Cook covered, stirring occasionally)
Heating creamed soups 200° 8 to 10 Min.
Vegetable 210° 2 to 3 Hr.
VEGETABLES
Fresh or frozen 210°-225° Until tender, covered
Potatoes:
Baked 375° 1 to 1½ hrs., on rack in covered aluminum pan
Hash Brown 325° Until brown
Sweet Potatoes (candied) 225°-235° 10 to 20 Min.
SPECIAL COOKING OPERATIONS See directions on following pages
DEEP FAT FRYING
Shrimp, Oysters, etc. 375°-400° 2 to 6 Min.
Doughnuts, Fritters 375°-400° 3 to 6 Min.
Onion Rings 375°-400° 6 to 7 Min.
Potatoes 375°-400° 6 to 10 Min.
MISCELLANEOUS
Melting Chocolate, Cheese, Butter 175° 7 to 9 Min., covered metal pan
Popcorn 375° 3 to 6 Min.
Pressure Cooking Follow manufacturer’s instructions
225°-235° 5 lb. pressure
235°-240° 10 lb. pressure
240°-250° 15 lb. pressure
WARMING
Baby Bottle Low to 150° Until warm
Leftovers 150°-175° 10 to 20 Min., covered pan
Rolls, wrapped in foil on rack 250° 15 to 20 Min., covered aluminum pan
To convert a favorite recipe to Burner-with-a-Brain cooking—if the recipe says:
Warm or melt use 150°-175° or Low
Simmer or low use 175°-200°
Boil use 200°-225°
High boil use 225°-250°
Fry use 250°-375°
Deep fat fry use 375°-400°
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RECIPES FOR “BURNER-WITH-A-BRAIN”

TOASTED POUND CAKE
For a simple but delicious dessert, toast slices of pound cake. Preheat griddle on the thermostatic top burner at 300 degrees. Cut slices of pound cake one inch thick; butter both sides or leave plain, depending on your flavor preference. When flame lowers, grill on hot griddle for about 3 minutes per side or until nicely browned. Serve plain or topped with ice cream and/or sauce.

WARMING ROLLS
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Wrap rolls or muffins in double thickness of aluminum foil, folding edges under tightly. Place foil wrapped package on rack or crumpled aluminum foil in aluminum skillet or saucepan on thermostatic top burner at 250 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes or until heated through.

HARD COOKED EGGS
Eggs
1 Tbsp. water for EACH egg
Place eggs and water in pan. Cover with tight fitting lid. Cook on thermostatic top burner at 200 degrees for 20 minutes. Remove from flame, pour off hot water and immediately cool with cold water. Peel immediately or refrigerate, peeling later. This method of preparation eliminates pot watching, cracked eggs and dark ring around yolks.

“PAN BAKED” APPLES
Wash and core 6 baking apples. Add a dash of cinnamon, one Tbsp. sugar and a dot of butter to each apple. Place apples in skillet or saucepan. Add one Tbsp. water for each apple to be cooked. Cover and cook on thermostatic top burner at 212 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes. Spoon sauce in bottom of skillet over each apple before serving.

“PAN BAKED” POTATOES
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Place scrubbed potatoes on a rack or on crumpled aluminum foil in aluminum skillet or saucepan. Do not add water or wrap potatoes in foil. Cover skillet or saucepan and bake on thermostatic top burner at 375 degrees until done, about 1 to 1½ hours.

“BUTTER BOIL” FROZEN VEGETABLE
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Break up frozen vegetable by pounding package against edge of counter. Place vegetable in saucepan with 2 to 3 tablespoons butter and ½ teaspoon salt. For starchy vegetables like lima beans and corn, 1 or 2 tablespoons of water may be needed. Cook on thermostatic top burner at 210 degrees. Cook time indicated on package plus 5 minutes.

NOTE: To prevent breaking spears of asparagus and broccoli, thaw just enough to break apart.

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FLUFFY RICE
For 3 cups of cooked white rice, place 1 cup uncooked rice, 2 cups water and 1 teaspoon salt in 2-qt. saucepan. Place on thermostatic top burner at 225 degrees. Bring to a boil, then cover pan, lower temperature setting to 190 degrees, and simmer about 15 minutes or until water is absorbed and rice is tender. For extra fluffy rice, turn burner off and let rice stand, covered for 10 minutes more.

Brown and wild rice are best cooked this way also, but cooking time will be much longer—about 35 to 45 minutes total cooking time. Also, add about ½ cup more water.

POPCORN
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Place 2 tablespoons of oil and ½ cup popcorn in 10-inch aluminum skillet or saucepan. Cover tightly and place on thermostatic top burner at 375 degrees. Heat until popping stops, about 3 minutes. No need to shake the pan. Pour into serving bowl and toss with melted butter and salt.

TO USE PRESSURE SAUCEPANS
Pressure cooking is extremely easy with a thermostatic top burner. The following temperatures may be used as a guide: 240° to 250° for 15 pounds pressure, 235° to 240° for 10 pounds, and 225° to 235° for 5 pounds. Use medium flame if the pressure saucepan is of non-aluminum material. Raise or lower the temperature if needed to maintain the correct pressure; once it is determined, record it for future use. Time pressure cooking from the time the desired pressure is reached.

DEEP FAT FRYING
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Accurate top burner temperature control makes deep fat frying just as easy as boiling water. Use a deep aluminum skillet or French fryer so oil will only half fill it and completely cover food. Preheat oil at recommended temperature (usually 375 to 400 degrees) until flame lowers, about 10 minutes. Add food in small amounts, cook until brown, turning once. Remove and drain on absorbent paper.

PAN BROILING
Set thermostatic top burner at 275 to 350 degrees depending on kind of meat and thickness. Preheat the griddle or skillet until the flame reduces. Rub pan lightly with a bit of meat fat. Brown meat on both sides. Do not cover. Do not add water. Pour off fat as it accumulates in pan. Turn meat occasionally so that it cooks evenly. Season and serve.

HAM SKILLET DINNER
1 ham slice, ½-inch thick
1 tsp. butter or margarine
8 small potatoes
1 pkg. (10-oz) frozen green beans
½ C. chopped onion
½ tsp. salt
Dash pepper
½ C. water
Brown ham slice on both sides in butter in large skillet. Add potatoes, green beans, onion, salt, pepper and water. Cover and place on thermostatic top burner at 215 degrees for 30 minutes. Makes 4 servings.

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APPLESAUCE UPSIDE-DOWN CAKE
½ pkg. applesauce spice cake mix (plus ingredients necessary to prepare according to directions on pkg.)
6 Tbsp. butter or margarine
¾ C. brown sugar, packed
1 C. canned apple slices, drained
¼ C. maraschino cherries
Prepare cake mix according to directions on package. Combine butter and brown sugar in 10-inch skillet; heat enough to melt and blend together. Arrange apple slices and maraschino cherries on sugar mixture. Spread cake batter over fruit. Cover skillet. Cook on thermostatic top burner at 250 degrees for 25 minutes. Uncover; allow to cook 5 minutes longer. Cool 2 to 3 minutes. Loosen sides and invert on platter, allowing pan to remain in position for 1 minute. Remove pan and serve. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

TOP BURNER CHEESE CAKE
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2 C. graham cracker crumbs
¼ tsp. cinnamon
¼ C. butter or margarine, softened
2 8-oz. pkg. cream cheese
1 C. coffee cream
1 C. sugar
2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
½ tsp. salt
3 eggs, separated
1 tsp. vanilla extract
¾ tsp. grated lemon peel
Cut two double thickness strips of aluminum foil 18 × 3 inches. Place crosswise over bottom and up side of 10-inch skillet, extending about an inch above rim of skillet. Cut a circle of foil to fit bottom of skillet and lay over foil strips. Grease foil and sides of skillet. Mix graham cracker crumbs and cinnamon. Cut in butter. Press mixture on bottom and about 2 inches up sides of skillet. Soften cream cheese, add cream and beat until smooth. Add combined sugar, flour and salt; blend. Add unbeaten egg yolks, vanilla extract and lemon peel; mix well. Beat egg whites to soft peak stage and fold into cheese mixture. Pour into crumb-lined pan and place on thermostatic top burner at medium flame and 235 degrees. Cover tightly and bake for one hour. Turn burner off and let cake stand one hour. Refrigerate covered, for 3 to 4 hours. Carefully lift cake from pan, using foil strips and transfer to serving plate. Trim off excess foil or pull strips carefully from underneath the cake. Spoon Festive Raspberry Sauce over individual servings if desired. Makes 10 to 12 servings.

NOTE: At the end of the cooking time this cheese cake will be very soft in the center. After 3 to 4 hours refrigeration, the cake will be firm enough to cut.

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FESTIVE RASPBERRY SAUCE:
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2 10-oz. pkg. frozen raspberries, thawed
2 Tbsp. sugar
2 tsp. cornstarch
Drain raspberries; reserve sirup. Combine sugar and cornstarch; add to reserved sirup in saucepan. Cook and stir on thermostatic top burner at medium flame and 212 degrees until mixture comes to a boil and thickens; cool. Add raspberries; refrigerate. When chilled, spoon raspberry sauce over cheese cake.

QUICK FUDGE
2 C. sugar
3 Tbsp. butter or margarine
½ tsp. salt
1 C. evaporated milk
½ C. miniature marshmallows
1½ C. semi-sweet chocolate pieces
⅔ C. chopped nuts
1 tsp. vanilla extract
Mix sugar, butter, salt and milk in a 10-inch skillet. Place over thermostatic top burner at 300 degrees. Bring mixture to a boil, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Continue stirring and allow to boil 4 to 5 minutes. Turn burner off. Add marshmallows, chocolate, nuts and vanilla; stir until marshmallows and chocolate are completely melted and smoothly blended. Place in a buttered 8-inch square pan, spreading evenly. Cool before cutting into squares. Makes approximately 2 pounds.

decorative drawing
GRIDDLE
One type of griddle is designed by the range manufacturer to fit over one of the surface burners. It can usually be converted to a fifth burner and is often thermostatically controlled. The other type is a portable separate utensil which fits over any range burner.

The griddle should be seasoned before using for the first time. To do this, brush surface with unsalted shortening. Heat on thermostatic top burner at 325 degrees for 15 minutes. Turn flame off and allow griddle to cool. While griddle is still warm, wipe off excess shortening with paper towel. The griddle is now ready for use.

The recommended thermostatic controlled burner temperature or a medium flame should be used when grilling foods. If griddle has no temperature indicator or is not thermostatically controlled, use a few drops of water as a test for proper cooking temperature. The water will form beads and “dance” when the griddle is ready to use.

21
GRILLING GUIDE
Preheat griddle at high flame and recommended temperature. Rub griddle lightly with a bit of meat fat.

FOOD THICKNESS TEMPERATURE TOTAL TIME
BEEF:
Club, T-Bone, Rib, Sirloin Steaks ¾″ 325°-350° 12-14 min. for medium
Cube Steaks ¼″ 350°-375° 4-6 min. for medium
Ground Beef Patties ½″ to 1″ 300°-325° 8-12 min. for medium
EGGS 300° 2-4 min.
FRENCH TOAST 350°-375° 2-3 min.
LAMB CHOPS ½″ to ¾″ 300°-350° 16-20 min.
PANCAKES 375°-400° 3-4 min.
PORK:
[a]Bacon ⅛″ 300°-325° 6-10 min.
Canadian Bacon ⅛″ 275°-300° 4-6 min.
Ham Slice ½″ 275°-300° 10-14 min.
[a]Sausage Patties ½″ 275°-300° 12-14 min.
[a]Do not preheat griddle.

 

IT’S EASY TO BAKE WITH … THE MODERN FUEL … GAS
BLUE FLAME OVEN TIPS
The oven should be allowed to preheat 10 to 15 minutes for most baking and all roasting operations.

Arrange pans 1½ inches from sides of oven and from each other for best heat circulation. There should also be 1½ inches of air space above and below each pan.

It is possible to use both racks at the same time in a Gas oven and still be assured of even browning. Two sheets of cookies or 4 layers of cake can be baked without shifting the pans. When using two racks and several pans, stagger the pans so no pan is squarely above another.

The most desirable baking results are obtained when the correct pan is used. Use the size pan recommended in the recipe. Use a medium weight aluminum or glass cake pan. Do not expect warped or darkened pans to produce even browning or a level product.

If food runs over in the oven, sprinkle with salt to stop smoking. Clean as soon as baking has been completed and oven has cooled.

Use minute timer to remind you when to check foods.

With a window in the door and an interior oven light, the cooking progress may be checked without opening the door. Leave oven door closed at least until the minimum baking time has elapsed.

When baking in glass pans, lower recommended temperature 25 degrees and use the recommended time.

For mixes, packaged and frozen foods, follow label directions. Remember, however, that cooking times are approximate and can be adjusted to suit personal preferences.

The non-tip oven rack may be pulled out for loading and unloading the oven without reaching into the heated oven.

Oven meals requiring same time and temperature for all foods have been planned on the following pages. Your own favorite recipes can also be cooked and held automatically with the new programmed system.

USE OF ALUMINUM FOIL
If aluminum foil is used in the oven, place a small sheet in the center of the oven bottom. The heated air MUST be allowed to circulate freely through the openings toward the outer edge of the 23oven bottom. DO NOT completely cover the oven bottom. DO NOT cover an oven rack with foil. Use aluminum foil only when absolutely necessary. DO NOT leave foil in the oven permanently. If these instructions are not followed, damage to the range and unsatisfactory baking results can be expected.

MEAT PROBE
A meat probe is a device for measuring, indicating and/or controlling internal temperature of meats by means of a metal probe inserted into the roast and linked to an indicator or actuator. This convenience feature eliminates guesswork and insures perfection every time.

Wipe meat with a clean, damp cloth. Season and place, fat side up, on rack in shallow roasting pan. Basting is not necessary.

When inserting probe into meat, put center section of probe into the lean center muscle away from bone and fat and as near the center of the meat as possible. When in use, the meat probe tip should be INSIDE the meat, not sticking through the meat and out the other side.

Always make certain the full length of probe is inserted in the meat. This may mean the probe will be inserted at an angle to have tip in center of muscle.

Plug other end of cable into socket in oven wall.

Turn selector dial to desired degree of doneness.

Set oven thermostat to 325 degrees.

DO NOT put an aluminum foil cover on meat when probe is used.

When roasting is completed, the control automatically signals, turns the oven off and/or reduces to and maintains a keep-warm temperature, depending on the type of thermometer.

Refer to manufacturer’s instruction booklet for further information.

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24
MEAT ROASTING GUIDE
OVEN TEMPERATURE 325 DEGREES

Cut Approx. Minutes Per Pound (3 to 5 lbs.) Approx. Minutes Per Pound (5 to 8 lbs.) Meat Thermometer Reading When Done (degrees F.)
BEEF
Rolled Rib
Rare 31-36 27-30 140
Medium 36-40 32-35 160
Well-done 40-45 38-40 170
Standing Rib
Rare 21-26 17-22 140
Medium 26-30 22-26 160
Well-done 30-35 28-33 170
VEAL
Leg 35-40 30 170
Loin 35 30 170
Shoulder (boned and rolled) 45 40 170
LAMB
Leg
Medium 35 30 175
Well-done 40 35 182
Shoulder (bone in) 30-35 182
Shoulder (boned and rolled) 40 182
FRESH PORK
Rib and Loin 35-40 35 170
Shoulder, Picnic 40 35-40 185
Shoulder, Butt 50-55 185
Fresh Ham, Whole (10-14 lbs.) 35-40 185
Cut Minutes Per Pound Meat Thermometer Reading When Done (degrees F.)
SMOKED HAM (Mild Cure)
15 lbs. and over 20 160
12-15 lbs. 21-22 160
10-12 lbs. 23-24 160
Under 10 lbs 25-26 160
Half Hams (5-8 lbs.) 26-28 160
Picnic Shoulder 30-35 170
Cottage Roll 35-40 170

POULTRY ROASTING GUIDE

Place breast-side up on rack in shallow pan. Brush skin with fat or cover with fat-moistened cloth.

Ready-to-Cook Weight (pounds) Oven Temperature Approx. Roasting Time Stuffed (Hours)
CHICKEN 1½-2½ 325 1¼-2
2½-3½ 325 2-3
3½-4¾ 325 3-3½
TURKEY (Note: Unstuffed birds require 5 min. less time per lb.)
6-8 325 3-3½
8-12 325 3½-4½
12-16 325 4½-5½
16-20 325 5½-6½
20-24 325 6½-7
26

RECIPES FOR OVEN

POTATO ROLLS

1 C. milk, scalded
1 C. mashed potatoes or ¼ C. instant potatoes prepared according to package directions
¾ C. shortening
1 C. sifted all-purpose flour
½ C. sugar
1 Tbsp. salt
1 cake compressed yeast
½ C. lukewarm water
2 eggs, beaten
4½ to 5 C. sifted all-purpose flour

Combine milk, potatoes, shortening, 1 C. flour, sugar and salt in large mixing bowl; let stand until lukewarm. Add yeast softened in lukewarm water; add eggs. Let stand 1 hour. Stir and add 4½ to 5 C. flour to make a slightly stiff dough. Knead until smooth on lightly floured surface. Return to greased mixing bowl. Let rise about 1 hour or until doubled in bulk. Shape desired number of rolls; place on greased baking sheet; let rise 1 to 1¼ hours or until doubled in bulk. Bake in Gas oven at 425 degrees 10 to 12 minutes. Makes 3 dozen medium-sized rolls.

NOTE: Punch down unused dough, cover and place in refrigerator until ready to use.

FOR CINNAMON ROLLS:

Use enough Potato Roll dough to roll into 12 × 6 inches rectangle, ¼-inch thick. Spread with mixture of ¼ C. melted butter, ¼ C. brown sugar, 1 tsp. cinnamon and ¼ C. chopped pecans. Roll as for jelly roll, cut into 9 slices. Butter a 9-inch square baking dish and pour in ¼ C. light corn sirup. Place rolls, cut side up, in dish. Let rise 1 to 1½ hours or until doubled in bulk. Bake in Gas oven at 425 degrees 12 to 15 minutes. Makes 9 rolls.

SOUTHERN BUTTERMILK BISCUITS

2¼ C. sifted all-purpose flour
¾ tsp. salt
½ tsp. soda
1 Tbsp. baking powder
½ C. + 2 Tbsp. shortening
¾ to 1 C. buttermilk

Sift together flour, salt, soda and baking powder. Cut in shortening with pastry blender or two knives until mixture resembles coarse corn meal. Stir in ¾ C. milk. Add enough more milk to make dough light and soft but not sticky. Turn out on lightly floured board or pastry cloth. Knead gently about 6 times. Roll dough to ½-inch thickness. Cut with floured biscuit cutter. Place on ungreased baking sheet. Bake in Gas oven at 450 degrees 10 to 12 minutes. Makes about 12 2-inch biscuits.

LEMON BREAD

6 Tbsp. shortening
1 C. sugar
2 eggs, beaten
1 Tbsp. grated lemon peel
1½ C. sifted all-purpose flour
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
½ C. milk
½ C. chopped English walnuts
⅓ C. sugar
3 Tbsp. lemon juice

Cream shortening and sugar. Add beaten eggs and lemon peel. Sift flour, baking powder and salt together and add alternately with milk. Fold in nuts. Pour into greased and floured 8½ × 4½ × 2½-inch loaf pan. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour or until done and lightly browned on top. Remove from oven and let cool in pan 15 minutes. Dissolve ⅓ cup sugar in lemon juice. Pour over bread. Let stand for 10 minutes. Remove bread from pan and cool. This is an excellent bread to use for buttered tea sandwiches.

27

PLAIN PASTRY

2¼ C. sifted all-purpose flour
1 tsp. salt
5 Tbsp. water
¾ C. shortening

Sift flour and salt into bowl. Remove ⅓ C. flour mixture and combine with water to form paste. Cut shortening into remaining flour until pieces are the size of peas. Add paste to shortening-flour mixture. Mix and shape into ball. For each crust, place half the pastry on floured board or pastry cloth. Roll ⅛-inch thick with short, light strokes from center out, keeping it circular in shape. Makes 2 nine-inch crusts.

Note: For baked shell: 450 degrees for 10 to 12 minutes.

LEMON MERINGUE PIE

 

¾ C. sugar
½ C. all-purpose flour
2 Tbsp. cornstarch
½ tsp. salt
2¼ C. boiling water
3 eggs, separated
¼ C. sugar
6 Tbsp. lemon juice
1 Tbsp. grated lemon peel
1 baked 9-inch pie shell

Combine ¾ C. sugar with flour, cornstarch and salt in saucepan. Slowly add boiling water, stirring constantly to keep smooth. Cook on thermostatic top burner at 200 degrees, stirring constantly, until smooth and thick enough to mound when dropped from spoon. Reduce temperature to 190 degrees; cover and cook 15 minutes. Beat egg yolks with ¼ C. sugar; gradually stir hot filling into egg yolk mixture. Return to pan and continue to cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add lemon juice and peel; mix well. Pour into pie shell.

MERINGUE:

3 egg whites
¼ tsp. cream of tartar
6 Tbsp. sugar
½ tsp. vanilla extract, if desired

Beat egg whites with cream of tartar until frothy. Gradually beat in sugar, a little at a time. Continue beating until stiff and glossy. Blend in vanilla extract. Pile meringue onto pie filling, being careful to seal the meringue to edge of crust to prevent shrinking. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes. Cool gradually, away from drafts.

TOFFEE TREATS

1 C. butter or margarine
1 C. brown sugar, packed
1 egg
2 C. sifted all-purpose flour
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 6-oz. pkg. semi-sweet chocolate pieces, melted
½ C. finely chopped nuts

Cream butter and sugar. Add egg; mix well. Add flour and vanilla; blend. Spread dough to ½-inch thickness on a 17 × 14-inch greased cooky sheet or in a 15½ × 10½-inch jelly roll pan. Spread with melted chocolate. Sprinkle nuts over top and press into chocolate. Bake in Gas oven at 375 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes. Score while still warm. When cool, cut and remove from cooky sheet. Makes approximately 4 dozen cookies.

28


LOW-TEMPERATURE OVEN CONTROL

Your new Gas range has a new type of oven thermostat that provides low-temperature heat control from 140° to 225°. This new feature has miraculously opened up a new temperature area with many special uses. See pages 30 and 31 to see how this control will help you!

GENERAL USE

OVEN OPERATION

You will notice the following characteristics with the new low-temperature oven control:

1. After turning the oven control to the desired temperature, there will be a slight delay (several seconds) before the oven burner comes on.

2. The oven burner turns on and off as the oven operates except at the “Broil” setting. Baking times and temperatures are not affected by the “off-on” control.

PREHEATING

When using temperatures below 225°, preheating is generally recommended. To preheat, just turn the control to the temperature you want. It is not necessary to turn it first to a higher setting. Allow 10 minutes for preheating.

COOLING THE OVEN

Many ranges have the special feature of programmed cooking which reduces the cooking temperature to the keep-warm setting automatically. However, there are two ways to cool the oven manually to a lower holding temperature:

1. The quickest method is to turn the oven control to the desired low-temperature setting and open the oven door for 10 to 15 minutes to allow excess heat to escape. Then close the door until ready to serve the food.

2. A second method of cooling is to turn the oven control to the lower setting about 15 minutes before the end of the usual cooking time for the food you are preparing. Let the oven cool with the door closed. As the oven cools gradually to the keep-warm temperature, the food will finish cooking. If the oven door is opened during this cool down period (approximately 45 minutes after you lower the temperature) additional cooking time may be needed.

29
KEEPING WHOLE MEALS WARM

The setting recommended for the main course is usually a good compromise if all the foods in a meal do not have the same recommended keep-warm temperature.

COVERING FOODS

Moist foods should be tightly covered; many foods need only a loose cover. Aluminum foil makes an ideal cover if the utensil has no lid.

CARVING MEAT

Generally it is best to wait until just before serving to carve meats—especially rare or medium meats. However, if you do wish to carve meats ahead of time, keep the exposed cut surfaces close together and cover lightly with dampened paper towels or a dampened tea towel.

PRO-TEN® (PRE-TENDERED) BEEF

The papain used as a tendering agent continues to tenderize while the meat is held at keep-warm temperatures. As a result, these meats can become too tender after a holding period. Cuts which are not naturally tender, such as chuck and brisket, hold best but should be served within 1 to 2 hours after cooking is completed.

®Swift and Co.

WARMING SERVING DISHES AND PLATES

Preheat the oven and warm dishes at 170°. Allow 10 to 20 minutes to warm dishes thoroughly. Do not set warm dishes on a cold surface as rapid temperature changes can cause cracking. Warm only china, pottery, earthenware or enamelware (not silver).

TO THAW AND FRESHEN BAKED GOODS

Preheat oven to 170°. Wrap baked goods loosely to prevent drying and permit evaporation of ice crystals formed during freezing. This low-temperature oven method thaws three to four times faster than at room temperature.

HOLDING TIME

Most cooked foods may be held safely at serving temperature for 4 hours after cooking is completed. However, food is most palatable and nutritious when served reasonably soon after cooking. Therefore, keep foods warm no longer than necessary—preferably no more than 1½ to 2 hours.

Top burner cooked foods are most attractive when held an hour or less. Green vegetables are especially subject to color and texture changes.

30

KEEP-WARM TEMPERATURES FOR OVEN COOKED FOODS

Foods should be still hot from cooking—These temperatures will keep them hot for serving.

 

FOOD TEMPERATURE SETTING
Bacon 200° to 225°
Baked Potatoes 200° to 225°
Beef, rare 155° to 170°
Beef, medium 170° to 180°
Beef, well done 170° to 200°
Biscuits, Muffins 170° to 190°
Casseroles (covered) 200°
Fish, baked or broiled (cover loosely) 170° to 200°
Ham 170° to 200°
Lamb 170° to 200°
Pies, pastry 155° to 170°
Pizza (cover loosely) 225°
Pork, fresh or smoked 170° to 200°
Poultry, roast 170° to 190°
Poultry, fried 185° to 200°
Rolls 190°
Seafood, baked or broiled (cover loosely) 170° to 200°
31

KEEP-WARM OVEN TEMPERATURES FOR TOP-BURNER-COOKED FOODS

TEMPERATURE SETTING
French-fried potatoes (uncovered, do not hold longer than 15 minutes) 200° to 225°
Mashed potatoes (covered) 155° to 170°
Pancakes, French Toast (loosely covered) 200° to 225°
Pan-fried meats, Fish and Poultry (loosely covered) 200° to 225°
Vegetables (covered) 170°

TO THAW FROZEN FOODS

PREHEAT OVEN TO 155°. Leave foods tightly wrapped in their moisture-vapor proof freezer wrapping. Thaw just enough to separate or to handle easily and once thawed, do not refreeze. In general, foods will thaw four times faster than at room temperature. Cook as soon as possible after thawing.

FOOD APPROXIMATE THAWING TIME AT 155°
Fish steaks or fillets, 1 package 40 minutes
Frying chicken, cut up 1¼ hours
Ground meat, 1 pound 1½ hours
Meat patties or chops 45 minutes
Poultry, 3 to 8 pounds 2 to 3½ hours
Poultry, 8 to 12 pounds 3½ to 5 hours
Poultry, 12 to 20 pounds 5 to 7 hours
Rolled roast, 5 to 6 pounds 4½ hours
Round steak, 1-inch thick 1 hour

 

PROGRAMMED COOKING

One of the most outstanding, truly automatic features of the Gas range is the programmed oven. Oven programming means that the oven will automatically change at a set time from one temperature to another—usually from a cooking to a keep-warm temperature. In other words, set the oven control for the cooking temperature and the amount of cooking time. The oven will cook the food, then automatically reduce to a keep-warm temperature to hold the foods for serving without over-cooking or drying out.

A. Foods which program well:

1. Most main dishes, especially casseroles and foods in sauces.

2. Covered foods.

3. Yellow vegetables, onions, or beets. Green vegetables, up to 1 to 2 hours; long holding period causes loss of color.

4. Roasts and other large cuts of meat.

5. Rice, noodles, macaroni.

B. Foods which should not be programmed:

1. Foods such as cookies, pies, and cakes which require exact cooking times should be removed from oven immediately. If they are to be kept warm, they should be rewrapped to prevent drying and then placed in the keep-warm oven.

2. Foods to be served immediately—souffles.

3. Broiled foods.

C. General rules:

1. Food may be held with safety for 4 hours after cooking is completed, but will be most palatable served within 1½ to 2 hours.

2. Any food which holds well in the low temperature oven usually programs well also.

3. FOR SPECIFIC PROGRAMMED OVEN FEATURES, REFER TO YOUR RANGE MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTION BOOKLET.

Food Weight Pounds Temperature Setting Degrees Approx. Cooking Time Hours Maximum Holding Time Hours
Rolled Rib Beef Roast, Medium 4 325 2½-3 4
Leg of Lamb Roast, Well Done 6 325 4
Loin End Pork Roast 5 325 4 4
Cured, Whole Ham 12 325 4
Veal Loin Roast 5 325 3 4
Meat Loaf, Well Done 3 350 3
Chicken, Stuffed 3½-4½ 325 3-3½ 3
Baked Fish, Stuffed 2½-3½ 400 45 min. 2
Ham Slice With Raisin Sauce 350 1 3
Stuffed Pork Chops 350 3
Swiss Steak (covered) 350 4
Glazed Carrots and Onions (covered) 350 3
Scalloped Potatoes (covered) 350 3
Stewed Tomatoes 350 1 4
Macaroni and Cheese Casserole 350 45 min. 3
Tuna and Noodle Casserole 400 40 min. 2
Turkey Casserole 350 25 min. 3
Apple Crisp 375 45 min. 4
Fudge Pudding 350 1 3

Many variables such as size, composition and initial temperature of the meat are often encountered in roasts of the same weight. Therefore, the oven timer settings can only be approximate. For more accurate and unattended meat roasting a meat probe is recommended.

34

PROGRAMMED OVEN MEALS

OVEN MEAL 1

Glazed Ham Slice
Succotash With Onion Butter
Fruit Compote
Temperature: 350 degrees
Time: 1 hour

(Complete the meal with Hearts of Lettuce Salad, bread and beverage.)

GLAZED HAM SLICE
1 center ham slice, 1-inch thick
¾ C. corn sirup
3 Tbsp. vinegar
3 Tbsp. dry mustard
¼ C. water
Slash fat on ham slice and place in shallow baking dish. Spread with mixture of corn sirup, vinegar and dry mustard. Pour water around ham. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Makes 6 servings.

SUCCOTASH WITH ONION BUTTER
2 10-oz. pkgs. frozen succotash
1 tsp. salt
2 Tbsp. chopped onion
¼ C. butter or margarine
Place frozen succotash in 10 x 6 x 2-inch baking dish. Sprinkle with salt and chopped onion; dot with butter. Cover. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Makes 6 servings.

FRUIT COMPOTE
1 1-lb. pkg. dried prunes
1 C. dried apricots
1 C. dried peaches
2 C. water
½ C. sugar
3 or 4 slices orange
Rinse fruit in warm water. Drain. Place in a 2-qt. baking dish. Add water, sugar and sliced orange. Cover. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for one hour. Makes 8 servings.

OVEN MEAL 2
Herb Crisp Chicken
Carrots Piquant
Date Nut Pudding
Temperature: 350 degrees
Time: 1 hour
(Complete the meal with a Mixed Green Salad, bread and beverage.)

uncaptioned
HERB CRISP CHICKEN
4 chicken legs with thighs connected
2 chicken breasts, halved
½ C. evaporated milk
1 C. corn flake crumbs
4 Tbsp. chopped parsley
2 tsp. paprika
2 tsp. salt
¼ tsp. pepper
35
Dip pieces of chicken in milk; roll in mixture of crumbs, parsley, paprika, salt and pepper. Place chicken pieces, skin-side up, in shallow baking pan lined with aluminum foil; do not crowd. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour.

CARROTS PIQUANT
1½ to 2 lb. carrots
¼ C. butter or margarine, melted
2 Tbsp. brown sugar, packed
2 drops Tabasco sauce
½ tsp. salt
Dash pepper
1 Tbsp. prepared mustard
Scrape carrots; cut into ¼-inch rings. Place carrots in buttered 10 x 6 x 2-inch baking dish. Combine melted butter, brown sugar, Tabasco sauce, salt and pepper; pour over carrots. Cover with lid or aluminum foil. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Just before serving, stir in prepared mustard. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

DATE NUT PUDDING
3 eggs, beaten
1 C. sugar
¼ C. all-purpose flour
1 tsp. baking powder
¼ tsp. salt
1 C. chopped dates
1 C. English walnut pieces
Beat eggs with sugar until light. Add sifted dry ingredients and mix well. Stir in dates and nuts. Turn mixture into a greased 10 x 6 x 2-inch baking dish. Set this dish into a larger pan with ½ inch of water. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

OVEN MEAL 3
Italian Meat Loaf
Butter Baked Carrots
Green Beans With Bacon Chips
Temperature: 375 degrees
Time: 50 minutes
(Complete the meal with bread, beverage and ice cream.)

uncaptioned
ITALIAN MEAT LOAF
2 slices rye bread
2 slices white bread
½ C. water
1 lb. ground beef
1 medium onion, chopped
1 Tbsp. chopped parsley
3 Tbsp. grated Parmesan cheese
1 egg
1 tsp. salt
¼ tsp. black pepper
2 Tbsp. butter or margarine
1 8-oz. can (1 C.) tomato sauce
1 tsp. oregano
Break bread into small pieces and soak in water. Combine beef with moistened bread, onion, parsley, cheese, egg, salt and pepper. Mix well. Place in 8¾ x 5 x 2½-inch greased loaf pan. Dot with butter. Bake in Gas oven at 375 degrees for 30 minutes. Pour tomato sauce over meat and sprinkle with oregano. Bake 20 minutes longer. Serve hot or cold. Makes 8 servings.

36
BUTTER BAKED CARROTS
1½ to 2 lb. carrots
½ tsp. salt
⅛ tsp. pepper
2 Tbsp. butter or margarine
Scrape carrots; cut into ¼-inch rings. Place carrots in buttered 10 x 6 x 2-inch baking dish. Sprinkle with combined salt and pepper; dot with butter. Cover with lid or aluminum foil. Bake in Gas oven at 375 degrees for 50 minutes. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

GREEN BEANS WITH BACON CHIPS
2 No. 303 cans (3½ C.) cut green beans
4 bacon slices
½ tsp. salt
Dash pepper
Drain green beans. Brown bacon. Remove bacon from skillet; crumble. Retain only 2 tablespoons of bacon fat in skillet. Return bacon to skillet. Add green beans, salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly. Place mixture in 1-qt. casserole; cover. Bake in Gas oven at 375 degrees for 50 minutes. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

OVEN MEAL 4
Pork Chops With Basil
Yummy Yams OR Baked Yams
Pecan Pie
Temperature: 350 degrees
Time: 1 hour
(Complete the meal with a Lettuce and Tomato Salad, bread and beverage.)

uncaptioned
PORK CHOPS WITH BASIL
½ C. all-purpose flour
½ tsp. salt
1 tsp. garlic salt
8 loin pork chops, trimmed
1 Tbsp. olive oil
½ tsp. dried basil
½ C. apricot nectar
Combine flour, salt, and garlic salt in a paper bag, add the chops and toss lightly until they are thoroughly coated. Heat oil in skillet on thermostatic top burner at 325 degrees; add pork chops and brown. Arrange the chops in a shallow ungreased baking dish without letting them overlap. Sprinkle with basil. Pour apricot nectar around chops. Cover the dish closely with aluminum foil. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Makes 8 servings.

YUMMY YAMS
3 9½-oz. cans baby yams
½ tsp. salt
1 lemon
1 tart apple, unpeeled
¼ C. honey
½ C. brown sugar, packed
1 Tbsp. butter or margarine
Drain yams; sprinkle with salt. Cut lemon in very thin crosswise slices. Quarter and core apple; slice into ¼-inch slices. Arrange in two rows lengthwise in 10 x 6 x 2-inch baking dish alternating yams, lemon and apple slices. Place skin side of apple slice up. Combine honey and brown sugar; mix well. Spoon over yam mixture. Dot with butter. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Makes 8 servings.

37
PECAN PIE
uncaptioned
½ C. butter or margarine
½ C. sugar
1 C. dark corn sirup
3 eggs, slightly beaten
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1½ C. pecans, broken
1 unbaked 9-inch pie shell
Cream butter; add sugar slowly, creaming until fluffy. Slowly stir in corn sirup, eggs, vanilla and pecans. Pour into pie shell and bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Cool. Serve with whipped cream, if desired.

OVEN MEAL 5
Baked Salmon Loaf
Savory Rice
Buttered Asparagus
Temperature: 350 degrees
Time: 1 hour
(Complete the meal with a bread, beverage and fruit dessert.)

uncaptioned
BAKED SALMON LOAF
1 1-lb. can red salmon
2 eggs, beaten
3 slices bread, cubed
1 tsp. salt
¼ C. butter or margarine, melted
1½ C. warm milk
Drain salmon, remove skin and bones; flake. Combine all ingredients. Mix thoroughly. Place in greased 9 x 5 x 3-inch loaf pan. Bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Makes 6 servings.

SAVORY RICE
⅓ C. butter or margarine
2 medium onions, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 C. long grain rice, uncooked
1 14-oz. can chicken broth
1 tsp. marjoram
½ tsp. parsley flakes
½ tsp. thyme
¼ tsp. salt
Melt butter in 2-qt. saucepan on thermostatic top burner at medium flame and 300 degrees. Add onions, garlic and rice. Cook until lightly browned, stirring constantly. Add chicken broth and seasonings and bring to a boil. Pour into 2-qt. casserole, cover and bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Stir before serving. Makes 6 servings.

BUTTERED ASPARAGUS
2 10-02. pkg. frozen asparagus
3 Tbsp. butter or margarine, melted
1 tsp. salt
¼ tsp. pepper
2 Tbsp. minced green onion
Thaw asparagus just enough to separate. Place in greased 1½-qt. casserole. Add seasonings and onion to melted butter and pour over asparagus. Cover and bake in Gas oven at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Makes 6 servings.

38
decorative drawing
SECRETS TO BETTER BAKING
BISCUITS ARE DARK ON BOTTOM, LIGHT ON TOP
Pan dark or heavy (use shiny cooky sheet)

Pan too deep or too large

BISCUITS ARE PALE
Temperature too low

Too much flour

Pan too deep (invert pan or use cooky sheet)

BREAD BURNING ON BOTTOM
Oven too full; shuts off proper circulation of heat

Wrong type of pans used. Granite or heavy black pans will cause this.

Pans placed too close to oven bottom

BREAD BURNING ON EDGES
Pans placed too close together

Too much dough in pan

CAKE IS UNDERSIZED
Too little leavening

Batter overbeaten

Pan too large

Temperature too high

Ingredients not at room temperature

CAKE IS HIGH IN MIDDLE
Too much flour

Temperature too high

CAKE HAS SOGGY OR RUBBERY LAYER
Batter undermixed

Too little leavening

Too much liquid

Temperature too low

Egg yolks underbeaten

CAKE FALLS
Too much shortening, liquid or sugar

Too much leavening

Insufficient or too slow baking

Pan too small

CAKE HAS TUNNELS
Not enough shortening

Overmixing after adding flour

All-purpose flour used

CAKE IS UNEVEN
Pans not staggered in oven

Batter uneven in pan

Warped pans

Range not level

Pans touching sides of oven or each other

SPONGE CAKE FALLS OUT OF PAN
Pan greased

Too much sugar

Insufficient baking

39
CAKE BURNS ON SIDES
Oven too full

Oven too hot

Pans too close to sides of oven

CAKE CRACKS ON TOP
Oven too hot

Too thick batter (If cake flour not used, decrease quantity about ¼ to ½ C. or increase liquid ¼ C.)

COOKIES AND BISCUITS TOO BROWN ON TOP
Cookie sheet set too high in oven

Uneven heat distribution in oven. See that vent is unobstructed

COOKIES TOO DARK ON BOTTOM
Cookie sheet set on too low a rack in oven

Cookie sheet too wide or too long for oven

Uneven distribution of heat in oven

MUFFINS HAVE TUNNELS AND SHARP PEAKS
Overmixing

PIE SHELL SHRINKS
Pastry stretched in pan

Too much water

Pastry not pricked enough

PIE HAS SOAKED CRUST
Temperature too low at start of baking

Filling too juicy

A glass pan or old dull or dark pan will give a browner, crisper undercrust

Avoid shiny tin or glossy aluminum pans for pies

Do not reduce temperature 25 degrees for pie when using oven glass, as you do when baking a cake

Chill unbaked crust before adding filling for custard or pumpkin pies

PIE BURNS AROUND EDGE OF CRUST
Temperature too high

Pans touching each other or oven wall

Edge of crust too thin

Granite or black metal pan may cause scorching

PIE HAS PALE TOP
Oven not hot enough

Oven too full cutting off circulation of air

Brush top with milk or cream

PIE NOT BROWN ENOUGH ON BOTTOM
Shiny tin or aluminum pan may cause this problem

Filling too thin—soaking bottom pastry

Temperature too low

40
decorative drawing
BROILER
Broiling is a fast method of cooking. It is smokeless because the broiler flame literally consumes any smoke formed. It is cool because it is done with the oven and broiler compartment doors closed.

There are no set rules for broiler cooking time because foods vary, personal preferences differ and broiler burners vary in speed and performance characteristics according to type.

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GENERAL BROILING TIPS
Always broil with full flame unless otherwise specified in recipe. If recipe requires low flame, preheat on full flame first; then lower flame to about 325 degrees to broil food. When preheating, remove the broiler pan from the broiler compartment. Preheat broiler 5 to 10 minutes. This speeds up broiling and gives browner and juicier meats. If broiler is not preheated, allow a few extra minutes on the broiling time.

Do not use aluminum foil on the broiler insert, for it will block the insert openings and prevent drainage of fat and drippings.

Allowances must be made for broiling large quantities of meat at one time by lowering broiler pan position.

Meat for broiling should be tender, but need not be expensive. Hamburgers, weiners, etc. are tasty when broiled.

Veal and fresh pork should not be broiled. Veal is too lean. Pork requires long, slow cooking to be eaten safely.

Always turn meat with tongs, as piercing it with a fork will cause unnecessary loss of meat juices.

Allow meat to brown well on the first side before turning it.

When turning meat, place on its original spot to cover the greasy area and prevent unnecessary charring on the pan insert.

Although it is possible to broil frozen meat, a better product is obtained by thawing before broiling. However, if frozen, increase distance from the burner and allow more time than the chart indicates.

In a Gas range that has a broiler below the oven, it is possible to bake and broil at the same time. Ham, fish, chicken, sandwiches, cold cuts and fruit are just a few of the foods than can be broiled using a low flame. Broiling time will be lengthened by this method. Meat will have a less crusty surface but will be tender and juicy.

41
INFRARED BROILING GUIDE
Remove broiler pan before preheating. Use high flame for preheating and cooking. Preheat 5 minutes.

FOOD DONENESS DESCRIPTION INCHES BETWEEN TOP OF FOOD AND FLAME MINUTES BROILING TIME TURNING ONCE
MEAT
Bacon Crisp Regular sliced 5 5
Ham ½ inch slice 6 10
Hamburger Medium ½ inch 6 8
Well-done ½ inch 6 10
Hot Dogs Scored diagonally 8 3
Lamb Chops Medium 1 inch 5 10
Well-done 1 inch 6 16
Liver Well-done ¼ inch 5 7
Steak, cube Medium ¼ inch 3 4
Steak Rare 1 inch 4 8
Well-done 1 inch 4 10
Rare 1½ inches 5 12-14
Well-done 1½ inches 5 18
Rare 2 inches 6 25
Well-done 2 inches 6 30
FISH
Fillets ½ inch 7 10
1 inch 9 12
Lobster 3 ounces 6 10
7 ounces 9 20
Shrimp Medium size 5 5
POULTRY
Chicken Halves or Breast 9 20
42

REHEATING FOOD IN THE INFRARED BROILER

Food that has been cooked, reheats exceptionally well in the infrared broiler. Preheat as usual. Use High flame. Turning is optional.

BEFORE REHEATING:

Food should be at room temperature, if possible. Brush fruits and vegetables with butter.

DISTANCE AND TIME:

Varies with thickness and quantity of food. Hamburger, chops, chicken and seafood reheat successfully at the same distance and time required when originally cooked.

Roasted meat, sliced ¼-inch thick, reheats successfully 3 inches from the flame in 2 to 3 minutes. Turning is not necessary.

CONVENTIONAL BROILING GUIDE

Food Thickness Inches between Top of Food and Flame Broiling Time Turning Once (minutes)
Bacon Thin Slices 3-5 5
(no turning)
Meat Patties 1 in. patties 2-3
Medium 8-12
Well-done 12-20
Liver ½ to ¾ in. 3 6-10
Lobster 4-5 20-25
Fruit
(Grapefruit, tomato or peach halves)
3-4 5-10
(no turning)
43

BROILER RECIPES

BROILED STEAKS

Steak is probably the most popular meat in America and certainly there is nothing more hearty or satisfying than a good steak, thick and juicy, and sizzling hot right from the broiler.

Figure ¾ to 1 pound of steak per person. It should be at least 1-inch thick. Trim away excess fat and slash remaining edge of fat to prevent curling.

To test a thick steak for doneness, make a small cut with a sharp knife near the bone.

When steak is done as desired, season with salt and pepper, spread with softened butter and serve on a hot platter.

The distance from the flame depends upon thickness of the meat and doneness preferred—the rarer the steak, the nearer to the flame. Broil until nicely browned; turn and finish cooking the second side.

PREHEAT BROILER COMPARTMENT 5 TO 10 MINUTES FLAME-HIGH

RARE: Place so top of meat is 1½ to 2 inches from flame. Broil 8 to 10 minutes, turning once.

MEDIUM: Place so top of meat is 2 to 3 inches from flame. Broil 12 to 18 minutes, turning once.

WELL-DONE: Place so top of meat is 3 to 5 inches from flame. Broil 20 to 25 minutes, turning once.

decorative drawing
BROILED CHICKEN

Preheat broiler compartment 5 to 10 minutes. Select 1½ to 2-lb. chicken for broiling. Split in half lengthwise. Break the wing, hip and leg joints to keep chicken flat. Season with salt and pepper. Arrange chicken skin side down on cold broiler pan. Brush with melted butter or margarine, if desired. Broil on the first side until brown, about 15 minutes; turn skin side up and broil until done. Total broiling time varies from 35 to 50 minutes. One chicken makes 2 to 3 servings.

Conventional Broiler:

DISTANCE—5 TO 8 INCHES

FLAME—HIGH

Infrared Broiler:

DISTANCE—8 TO 9 INCHES

FLAME—HIGH

BROILED FISH

Preheat broiler compartment 5 to 10 minutes. Arrange fish fillets or steaks on cold broiler pan insert. Place fillets skin side down. Dot with butter or margarine and sprinkle with salt and paprika. Broil without turning until golden brown and fish flakes easily when tested with a fork, 10 to 13 minutes.

1½ lb. fish makes 4 to 6 servings.

Conventional Broiler:

DISTANCE—4 INCHES

FLAME—HIGH

Infrared Broiler:

DISTANCE—9 INCHES

FLAME—HIGH

44

BROILED HAM

Preheat broiler compartment 5 to 10 minutes. Have ham steak cut ¾ to 1-inch thick. Slash edges of fat to prevent curling. Place ham on cold broiler pan insert. Broil 10 to 20 minutes, depending on thickness of ham, turning once.

Conventional Broiler:

DISTANCE—3 TO 5 INCHES

FLAME—HIGH

Infrared Broiler:

DISTANCE—5 INCHES

FLAME—HIGH

STEAK CHAMPIGNONS

4 sirloin strip steaks, 1-inch thick
1 Tbsp. chopped green onion
1 4-oz. can sliced mushrooms
2 Tbsp. butter or margarine
1 Tbsp. chopped parsley
1 Tbsp. lemon juice
Salt
Pepper
Butter or margarine for garnish

Have butcher cut pocket in steaks. Cook onion and mushrooms in 2 tablespoons butter in skillet on thermostatic top burner at 212 degrees for 5 minutes. Add parsley, lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste. Lightly season pockets with additional salt and pepper; fill with 2 tablespoons mushroom mixture. Secure with a wooden tooth pick. Place in preheated Gas broiler about 3 inches from high flame. Broil 5 minutes or until nicely browned; turn and broil 2 to 3 minutes longer. Garnish with softened butter and serve immediately. Makes 4 servings.

REUBEN GRILL

2½-oz. corned beef, chopped
2-oz. process Swiss cheese, grated
¾ C. chopped drained sauerkraut, packed (reserve juice)
¼ C. sauerkraut juice
¼ C. mayonnaise
Salt
Pepper
8 slices rye brea
2 Tbsp. butter or margarine, melted

Combine first 7 ingredients, mix well. Brush bread with butter on one side only. Spread the buttered side of each slice of bread evenly with ¼-inch layer of corned beef mixture. Place in preheated Gas broiler about 7 to 9 inches from high flame. Broil about 5 minutes. Press 2 halves together. Serve immediately. Makes 4 sandwiches.

SIX ’N ONE HAMBURGER

1 lb. ground beef
½ C. canned whole tomatoes, chopped and well drained
¾ C. soft bread crumbs
1 tsp. salt
¼ tsp. pepper
2 Tbsp. chopped onion
2 tsp. chopped fresh parsley
½ C. shredded Cheddar cheese

Place ground beef in medium size mixing bowl. In small bowl combine tomatoes, bread crumbs, salt, pepper, onion and parsley. Add combined ingredients to beef and toss lightly with a fork. Form mixture into a large patty, 6 × 6 × 1 inches in the center of a 12-inch square of aluminum foil. Fold exposed 3-inch edge of foil underneath to fit size of meat patty. Place in preheated Gas broiler about 3 inches from high flame. Broil about 6 minutes or until nicely browned; turn meat with pancake turner and remove foil. Broil about 6 minutes on second side. Remove meat from broiler; top with cheese. Cut into squares. Makes 6 servings.

45

STRAWBERRY POUND CAKE DELIGHT

1 12-oz. frozen pound cake, thawed
1 C. commercial sour cream
¼ C. brown sugar, packed
1 pt. fresh strawberries

Slice cake into four ½-inch lengthwise layers; lay cake layers in bottom of broiler pan. Spread sour cream evenly over top of each layer; sprinkle with brown sugar. Using a spatula, swirl top of the mixture to slightly blend the cream and sugar. Place in preheated Gas broiler about 7 to 9 inches from high flame. Broil 6 to 7 minutes. Make two separate cakes, placing one layer on top of another, keeping cream and sugar side up. Cut each cake crosswise into 3 servings. Using 1 pint of berries, garnish the top of each serving. Pour strawberry glaze over berries on cake. Serve immediately. Makes 6 servings.

STRAWBERRY GLAZE

1 pt. fresh strawberries
1 C. sugar
1½ Tbsp. cornstarch
Dash salt

Wash, drain and hull strawberries; crush. If necessary add enough water to make 1½ cups. Place strawberries and juice in saucepan on thermostatic top burner at medium flame and 212 degrees; gradually stir in mixture of sugar, cornstarch, and salt. Bring to boiling, boil 1 minute, stirring constantly. Cool. Pour over berries on cake. Makes 6 servings.

NOTE: This glaze should be made in advance and cooled before broiling the cake.


ROTISSERIE

ROTISSERIE TIPS

Foods cooked on the rotisserie require little attention because they rotate slowly, basting themselves to achieve flavor and appearance.

It is best to bring meat to room temperature before cooking.

Before preheating, check to see that food on rotisserie spit is centered under the burner and rotating evenly. Reposition food if necessary.

For most accurate test of doneness, use a meat thermometer. It will indicate internal temperature which is more accurate than estimating time. Insert carefully so thermometer does not touch fat, bone or rotisserie spit, or hit any part of compartment when meat is rotating.

Bones and fat are both good conductors of heat, so roasts which have larger amounts will cook more quickly than lean boneless pieces.

Smaller pieces of meat require a longer cooking time per pound than large pieces of meat.

Season the cavity of poultry before cooking. Stuff if desired. Tie wings and legs close to body before securing firmly on rotisserie spit. Season skin. Brushing with butter is not necessary.

When using High flame, baste only during the last 10 minutes of cooking. When a longer basting period is desired, it is best to use Low flame.

To make a roast carve more easily, allow the meat to “set” after cooking. Rare roasts should be covered loosely and allowed to stand in a Gas oven at 170 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes before carving. The medium and well-done roasts should be allowed about half this much time.

46

CONVENTIONAL BURNER ROTISSERIE GUIDE

Consult manufacturer’s instruction booklet for specific information. The following is intended only as a guide.

The rotisserie may be located in the oven, broiler or on top of the range. FOR ROTISSERIE LOCATED IN OVEN, FOLLOW TIME AND TEMPERATURE GIVEN IN OVEN MEAT ROASTING GUIDE.

In built-in ranges with rotisserie located in broiler compartment under oven, set oven thermostat at 350 degrees for low flame; at “broil” for high flame. Keep door closed as for broiling.

Preheat 10 minutes.

FOOD WEIGHT POUNDS FLAME SETTING FOR ROTISSERIE MINUTES PER POUND
BEEF
Rolled Rib 4-6 In Broiler—Low Rare 26-30
Medium 35-40
Well-done 40-45
Tenderloin 2½-3 In Broiler—medium Rare 10-15
Medium 15-20
Well-done 22-28
LAMB
Rolled Leg 4-5 In Broiler—low 40-45
PORK
Canadian Bacon 3-4 In Broiler—low 20-25
Ham-cured 3-4 In Broiler—low 35-40
Ham-precooked 4 In Broiler—low 20
Loin, fresh (boned and rolled)
use meat thermometer to make sure that pork roasts are well-done.
3-5 In Broiler—low 45-55
47
FOOD WEIGHT POUNDS FLAME SETTING FOR ROTISSERIE COOKING TIME
Spareribs In Broiler—low 1½-2 hours
Weiners In Broiler—medium 12-15 min.
POULTRY
Chicken (halved) 2-3 In Broiler—low 1-1¼ hours
Chicken (whole) 2-3 In Broiler—medium 1¼-1½ hours
Cornish Hen ¾-1 In Broiler—low 1½-2 hours
Duckling 4-5 In Broiler—low 2½-3 hours

INFRARED BURNER ROTISSERIE GUIDE

Use High flame for preheating and cooking

Preheat 5 minutes

FOOD WEIGHT POUNDS DONENESS MINUTES PER POUND INTERNAL TEMPERATURE
BEEF
Rolled Rib 4-6 Rare 20 140°F.
Medium 22 160°F.
Well-Done 25 170°F.
Rib Eye Roast 3-4 Rare 20 140°F.
Medium 22 160°F.
Well-Done 25 170°F.
LAMB
Rolled Leg 3-4 Medium 25 175°F.
PORK
Canadian Bacon 2-3 Well-Done 20 170°F.
Ham—Ready-to-Eat 5-6 Well-Done 20 160°F.
Loin—Bone In 4-5 Well-Done 15 170°F.
POULTRY
Broiler-fryer 2-3 Well-Done 20 190°F.
Turkey (not stuffed) 6-8 Well-Done 15 190°F.
48


COOKING TERMS AND METHODS

Note: See pages 12 through 18 to use thermostatic top burner for these methods.

BOIL

To cook in a liquid at a temperature of 212 degrees. Visually, bubbles should rise continually. Method: cover the pan and bring the contents to a boil over a high flame. Then turn to the simmer flame (first click on many burners) and continue boiling, covered until done.

BRAISE

To cook meat or poultry by searing in fat, then simmering in a covered pan in small amount of moisture. Method: generally, meats are seasoned and rolled in flour and browned in hot fat. Then add a small amount of liquid and cover the pan. Turn burner valve knob to simmer flame, so food simmers, not boils, until done.

DEEP FAT FRY

To cook in fat deep enough to completely cover the food being cooked. A saucepan or skillet may be used. Method: use a high flame to bring the fat to frying temperature (usually 375 degrees), then lower the flame until it just maintains the desired fat temperature.

HIGH BOIL

This term is used to describe a vigorous, rolling boil which cannot be stirred down. It cooks no faster than a gentle boil but is needed for cooking foods like macaroni or jellies and jams. Method: cover the pan and use a high flame to bring the contents to a boil quickly. Then uncover the pan and turn to a medium flame or enough heat to maintain a high boil. The food is cooked uncovered in this case to prevent boil-overs and/or to permit evaporation.

MELT

To liquify a solid food by heat. Method: heat over “keep warm” flame until liquified. Covering the pan will speed melting.

PAN BROIL

To cook uncovered on a hot surface, usually in a skillet, pouring off fat as it accumulates. Method: heat skillet on “high”. Do not add fat or water and do not cover. Turn to “simmer” and brown meat slowly on both sides, pouring off fat as it accumulates.

SAUTÉ OR PAN FRY

To cook uncovered in a hot skillet in a small amount of fat. Method: heat just enough fat or butter to keep the meat from sticking (one to four tablespoons) in a skillet over a low to medium flame, depending on the utensil material. Add the food to the hot fat and cook, turning occasionally, until brown as desired.

49
SIMMER

To cook in liquid, usually water, at a temperature below the boiling point. Small bubbles are formed and rise slowly, but the liquid is practically motionless. Method: cover the pan and bring the food to the boiling point over a high flame. Then turn to the “simmer” flame.

STEW

To cook foods slowly in a covered pan in enough water to cover the food. Method: this is the same as braising except that more liquid is used. The food should simmer, not boil.

MEASURING THE RIGHT WAY
ALWAYS MEASURE ACCURATELY WITH STANDARD MEASURING EQUIPMENT

FLOUR

1. Always sift cake and all-purpose flour before measuring. Sift pre-sifted flour unless recipe specifically says otherwise. Do not sift rye, graham or whole wheat flour. Instantized flour cannot be sifted.

2. Sift onto waxed paper. Spoon lightly into dry measuring cup, being careful not to pack or shake it. Level with straight-edged spatula, without packing down.

LIQUIDS

1. Always set liquid measuring cup on level surface and fill to desired mark.

2. If thick like molasses or sirup, level off with spatula.

SHORTENING

Use graduated measuring cups. Have shortening at room temperature. Pack firmly into measuring cup. Level off with straight-edged spatula.

BROWN SUGAR

Use graduated measuring cup. Pack down in cup with back of spoon, just enough to hold together when turned out.

BUTTER AND MARGARINE

One stick (¼ lb.) equals ½ cup. To measure ¼ cup, cut stick in half. 1 Tbsp. equals ⅛ of a stick. Do not substitute whipped margarine or butter unless recipe specifically calls for it.

DRIED FRUITS

Pack raisins, dates, figs, etc. lightly into measuring cup. Press gently to level off top.

NUTS AND COCONUT

Pack lightly into cup and level off.

SOFT BREAD CRUMBS

Pack lightly into measuring cup. Do not press down hard. Level off.

FINE DRY BREAD CRUMBS

Spoon lightly into measuring cup and level off. Don’t shake cup.

SHREDDED OR GRATED CHEESE

Pack lightly into measuring cup and level off.

50


COMMON CAN AND JAR SIZES

CAN SIZES
Size of Cans Weight Cups Per Can
8 oz. can 8 oz. 1 C.
Picnic can (No. 1) 10½ oz. 1¼ C.
12 oz. can 12 oz. 1½ C.
No. 300 can 14 to 16 oz. 1¾ C.
No. 303 can 16 to 17 oz. 2 C.
No. 2 can 1 lb., 4 oz. or
1 pt., 2 fl. oz.
2½ C.
No. 2½ can 1 lb., 13 oz. 3½ C.
No. 3 can 3 lb., 3 oz. or
1 qt., 14 fl. oz.
5¾ C.
No. 10 can 6½ to 7 lb., 5 oz. 12 to 13 C. or 3¼ qt.

SUBSTITUTING INGREDIENTS

Ingredients Quantity Substitute(s)
BAKING POWDER 1 teaspoon double-acting 1½ teaspoons phosphate or tartrate baking powder
¼ teaspoon baking soda plus ½ cup buttermilk or sour milk
¼ teaspoon baking soda plus ⅝ teaspoon cream of tartar
BUTTER 1 cup 1 cup margarine
⅞ to 1 cup hydrogenated fat plus ½ teaspoon salt
⅞ cup lard plus ½ teaspoon salt
CHOCOLATE 1 square unsweetened 3 tablespoons cocoa plus 1 tablespoon shortening
CORNSTARCH
(for thickening)
1 tablespoon 2 tablespoons flour (approx.) or 4 teaspoons quick-cooking tapioca
CORN SIRUP 1 cup 1 cup sugar plus ¼ cup liquid (as replacement for ½ of sugar in recipe)
CREAM 1 cup coffee cream (20% milk fat) 3 tablespoons butter plus ⅞ cup milk
1 cup heavy cream (40% milk fat) ⅓ cup butter plus ¾ cup milk
EGGS 1 whole egg 2 egg yolks
FLOUR (for thickening) 1 tablespoon ½ tablespoon cornstarch
2 teaspoons quick-cooking tapioca
FLOUR (sifted) 1 cup all-purpose 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons cake flour
1 cup cake flour ⅞ cup all-purpose flour
HERBS 1 tablespoon fresh 1 teaspoon dried
HONEY 1 cup 1 to 1¼ cups sugar plus ¼ cup liquid
MILK 1 cup fresh milk 1 cup reconstituted non-fat dry milk plus 2 teaspoons butter
1 cup whole milk ½ cup evaporated milk plus ½ cup water
1 cup sour milk 1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar plus sweet milk to make 1 cup
1¾ teaspoons cream of tartar plus 1 cup sweet milk
YEAST 1 cake compressed 1 package or 2 teaspoons active dry yeast

COLUMBIA GAS SYSTEM

HSR-67

Transcriber’s Notes

  • Silently corrected a few typos, including listed errata.
  • Retained publication information from the printed edition: this eBook is public-domain in the country of publication.
  • In the text versions only, text in italics is delimited by _underscores_.