Freezing Combination Main Dishes

Freezing
combination main dishes

Home and Garden Bulletin No. 40
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

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Freezing
combination main dishes

Vacant space in your freezer? Put some of it to use by freezing main dishes—prepared, ready to be heated or cooked and served. Days or weeks later you, your family, guests perhaps, can enjoy the results of your foresight.

Included in this publication are general directions for successful freezing of such main dishes as the stews, meat loaves, and casserole combinations made from recipes given on pages 6 to 19.

For tiptop quality and economical use of freezer space, plan your freezing and use of precooked main dishes so that they will be in the freezer no longer than 2 or 3 months. However, most of these foods if properly packaged and stored will not suffer serious quality loss if kept up to 6 months. After 6 months’ storage, quality often declines rapidly, but the food is still safe to eat.

Preparing the food

In general, prepare the food as you would if it were to be served right away. Do not overcook. Some ingredients in main dishes that must be reheated for serving are better if slightly underdone for freezing. If cooked well-done before freezing, foods such as vegetables and macaroni are likely to be too soft when reheated. They also may have a warmed-over taste.

Soups and sauces thickened with ordinary wheat flour may tend to separate or curdle on thawing. Frozen gravies, sauces, and soups may be somewhat thicker after thawing than when freshly prepared, but suitable liquid can be added to give the desired consistency. Commercially frozen soups, sauces, and gravies are often made with waxy rice flour, which results in 3a smoother product. If waxy rice flour is available, it is a good idea to use it. However, soups, sauces, and gravies made with ordinary flour can be satisfactory if they are quick-frozen and stored at 0° F. for only 2 to 3 months. Stirring during reheating helps to overcome separation, too.

Crumb or cheese toppings are best added when the food is reheated for serving.

Pastry crusts frozen unbaked are more tender and flaky and have a fresher flavor than those baked and then frozen.

Cooling

Quick cooling of the food immediately after it is cooked stops the cooking and so helps keep the natural flavor, color, and texture of the food. It also retards or prevents the growth of bacteria that may cause spoilage.

To cool, set uncovered pan of food in iced or very cold water; change the water to keep it cold. Or set pan on ice. Or put the uncovered pan of food in a cold place.

Packaging

As soon as the food is cool, put it promptly into freezer containers of moisture-vapor-proof or moisture-vapor-resistant packaging material. Pack the food tightly into the container to reduce the amount of air in the package.

In quart containers, the food may be separated into two or three layers by a double thickness of water-resistant material such as cellophane between the layers. This makes it possible to separate the frozen block of food easily to shorten the reheating time.

Choose a size of container that holds only enough for one meal for your family. Quart containers hold 4 to 6 servings; pints, 2 to 3. Use only containers with wide top openings so the food does not have to be thawed completely to remove it from the container.

Containers and materials. Many combination main dishes are semiliquid in consistency 4and are best packaged in rigid containers made of moisture-vapor-proof materials such as aluminum, glass, pottery, plastic, plain or enameled tin, or moisture-vapor-resistant material such as heavily waxed cardboard.

Some prepared foods, like meat pies and casserole dishes, may be frozen in the containers in which they were baked, ready for reheating at time of using.

Bags of suitable material can be used for semiliquid foods but are less convenient than rigid containers. They are well adapted to less moist foods. Sheets of freezer packaging materials are used for wrapping foods that hold their shape.

Bags and sheets are made of moisture-vapor-resistant cellophane, heavy aluminum foil, pliofilm, polyethylene, or laminated papers consisting of combinations of paper, metal foil, glassine, cellophane, or other materials.

Unwaxed folding cardboard cartons are often used to hold foods packaged in bags or sheets for protection against tearing and for easy stacking in the freezer. Sheets of packaging material may be used as outer wraps for unwaxed cardboard cartons containing unwrapped foods. The sheets are sealed with freezer tape, or with a warm iron if they are heat-sealing on both sides.

Ordinary waxed papers, household aluminum foil, and cartons designed for cottage cheese and ice cream are not sufficiently moisture-vapor-resistant to be suitable for packaging foods to be frozen and held more than a few days.

Head space. Since liquid expands as it freezes, allow ample head space when packing liquid and semiliquid foods. Most freezer containers have a mark or line to show how much head space to leave. For a tall, straight or slightly flared container and for bags, ½ inch is generally recommended for pints and 1 inch for quarts. For low, broad containers less head space is needed, about ¼ inch for pints and ½ inch for quarts. To assure a good closure, keep sealing edges free from moisture or food.

When packaging foods with freezer sheet material, wrap them as tightly as possible.

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Sealing. Seal rigid freezer containers by adjusting the lids as required for the type of package used. Casseroles made of ovenproof material can be covered and then sealed with freezer tape or wrapped as needed.

Bags can be sealed by twisting and folding back the top and securing with a string or with a paper-covered metal strip or rubber band that may come with the bag. Some bags and sheets may be heat-sealed with a warm household iron or one of the special sealing irons available on the market. Others may be sealed with freezer tape.

Freezing

Freeze prepared foods as soon as they are packed. Freeze and store at 0° F. or below.

Reheating for serving

Most precooked frozen foods can be reheated either in the oven or on top of the range. Reheating in the oven takes little of the cook’s attention and usually keeps the texture of the food better. Reheating on top of the range in a double boiler or saucepan is faster.

When using a double boiler, start with warm, not hot, water in the lower pan so the thawing food won’t stick.

Reheating over direct heat requires considerable attention because the food must be stirred often. The stirring may result in less desirable texture.

If heating several blocks of frozen food, don’t stack them—use a wider pan.

Generally it is better to reheat frozen cooked main dishes without thawing. However, to transfer the food to another container for reheating or to remove cellophane between layers, you will need to partially thaw the food. Do this by placing the package in lukewarm water for a few minutes.

If you thaw food completely before reheating, it is usually best to thaw in the refrigerator. Thawing at room temperature is not recommended. Once food is thawed, use it immediately.

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RECIPES

When you are preparing a main dish it often takes little more effort and time to make enough for several meals. You can freeze it all in meal-size packages, or serve part of it the same day and freeze the rest.

The following recipes yield enough for 16 to 25 portions of the size indicated. For these larger-than-usual quantities you may need to check the size of your cooking utensils. As a guide to the size of utensil needed, multiply the number of portions by the size of portion to find out the total quantity of food that the recipe makes.

Recipes include directions both for serving the food immediately and for reheating the frozen food for serving.

POULTRY COMBINATION DISHES

Creamed chicken and chicken a la king are two favorites for freezing. Recipes are also given here for chicken and turkey in appetizing casserole dishes that freeze well.

If chicken broth is not available, you can substitute 1 cup canned chicken bouillon or 1 chicken bouillon cube and 1 cup hot water for each cup of chicken broth called for in a recipe.

Creamed chicken

16 portions, ¾ cup each

¾ cup chicken fat, butter, or margarine
1⅛ cups sifted all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon salt
4 cups chicken broth
4 cups milk
2 quarts diced cooked chicken

Melt the fat and blend in the flour and salt. Add broth and milk. Cook until thickened, stirring constantly. Add the chicken and heat to blend flavors.

To serve immediately. Heat the mixture thoroughly and serve on rice, toast, or biscuits.

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To freeze. Cool the food quickly. Pack in freezer containers, leaving head space (p. 4). (Pint containers are preferable to larger ones because large blocks of creamed chicken are difficult to thaw.) Seal and freeze immediately.

To prepare for serving. Without thawing, heat frozen creamed chicken in the top of a double boiler, about 30 minutes for 1 pint.

Menu suggestion. Serve with snap beans and shredded carrot and raisin salad. Have fruit sherbet and crisp cookies for dessert.

Chicken a la king

16 portions, ¾ cup each.

½ cup chicken fat, butter, or margarine
6 tablespoons chopped green pepper
3 cups canned mushrooms
¾ cup sifted all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons salt
3 cups chicken broth
3 cups milk
6 tablespoons finely cut pimiento
3 pints diced cooked chicken

Melt the fat and cook green pepper and mushrooms in it about 5 minutes. Blend in the flour and salt, then add broth and milk. Cook until thickened, stirring constantly. Add pimiento and chicken. Blend well.

To serve immediately. Heat the mixture thoroughly and serve on biscuits, hot, buttered toast, or in timbales.

To freeze. Cool the food quickly. Pack in freezer containers, leaving head space (p. 4). (Pint containers are preferable to larger ones because large blocks of chicken a la king are difficult to thaw.) Seal and freeze immediately.

To prepare for serving. Without thawing, heat frozen chicken a la king in the top of a double boiler, about 30 minutes for 1 pint.

Menu suggestion. Serve with asparagus and stuffed tomato salad, and upside-down cake.

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Turkey-macaroni casserole

25 portions, ¾ cup each

1¼ quarts shell or other macaroni
2 quarts boiling salted water
⅔ cup melted butter or margarine
1¼ cups sifted all-purpose flour
2 quarts milk
1½ tablespoons salt
¼ teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon marjoram
2½ cups grated cheese
¾ cup chopped pimiento
1¼ quarts diced cooked turkey

Cook the macaroni in boiling salted water 15 minutes or until almost tender; drain and rinse with water. Combine the melted butter or margarine with the flour, stir in the milk, and cook until thick. Add seasonings, cheese, pimiento, macaroni, and turkey.

To serve immediately. Place enough for one meal in a greased casserole and top with grated cheese if desired. Bake uncovered at 350° F. (moderate oven) for 30 to 40 minutes.

To freeze. Cool the food quickly. Pack in freezer containers, leaving head space (p. 4). Seal and freeze immediately.

To prepare for serving. Bake uncovered at 400° F. (hot oven) until food is heated through, about 45 minutes for pints, 1 hour for quarts.

A topping of grated cheese may be added to this dish the last 5 minutes of heating.

Menu suggestion. Serve with broiled tomato halves and julienne snap beans. Steamed cranberry pudding would make a good dessert for this meal.

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MEAT STEWS AND MEAT PIES

Almost any type of meat stew, ragout, or goulash—beef, lamb, pork, or veal—can be frozen. Most vegetables in these combination dishes freeze well. Frozen potatoes may not be of the same quality as fresh-cooked potatoes, but they are acceptable if the stew or meat pie is not stored for more than 6 months.

Add a rich, flaky biscuit or pastry topping to a good meat and vegetable stew and you have a delicious meat pie, a family treat that freezes well. The biscuit or pastry topping may be added before freezing or made fresh and added to the pie when reheating for serving.

It is best to freeze meat pies and turnovers unbaked.

Lamb or beef pie

24 portions, 2½ by 2¾ inches

3 pounds boneless lamb or beef cut in 1-inch pieces
1 quart water
1 tablespoon salt
1½ cups chopped celery
3 cups cubed potatoes
3½ cups quartered onions
½ cup peas, fresh or frozen
½ cup sifted all-purpose flour
Pastry (see p. 10 for recipe)

Brown the meat in its own fat. Add the water and one-half of the salt. Simmer until meat is tender. Add celery, potatoes, onions, peas, and remaining salt and cook until vegetables are almost tender.

Drain the broth from the meat and vegetables. Add water to the broth if needed to make 3½ cups. Add ½ cup cold water to the flour and stir until smooth. Slowly add the flour mixture 10to the rest of the broth and cook until thickened, stirring constantly.

Combine the thickened broth with the meat and vegetables.

To serve immediately. Pour stew for one meal into a greased baking dish. Top with a pastry crust. Bake at 400° F. (hot oven) for 30 minutes.

To freeze. Cool meat mixture quickly. Place in ovenproof baking dish and top with pastry. Wrap in freezer packaging material. Or package stew in freezer containers, leaving head space (p. 4). Seal and freeze.

To prepare for serving. Bake meat pies frozen with pastry topping at 400° F. (hot oven) about 4-5 minutes for pints, 1 hour for quarts, or until stew is piping hot and crust is golden brown.

If stew is frozen without pastry topping, transfer it to a greased baking dish and place in hot oven. After stew is almost heated through (about 30 minutes), top with pastry crust. Bake until crust is golden brown.

Menu suggestion. Your favorite fruit salad will add zest to the meal. For dessert try chocolate fudge cake or pistachio ice cream with chocolate sauce.

Pastry topping for lamb or beef pie

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup shortening
½ cup cold water

Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Cut in the shortening until the mixture is granular. Add water and mix lightly with a fork.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board or pastry cloth, roll to about ⅛ inch in thickness, and cut to fit the baking dish or freezer container.

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Ham turnovers

25 portions, 1 turnover each

1½ quarts ground cooked ham (lightly packed)
⅓ cup finely chopped onion (well packed)
1 cup tomato sauce
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
¼ teaspoon pepper
¾ teaspoon powdered dry mustard
¾ teaspoon prepared horseradish
6½ cups sifted all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons salt
1¾ cups shortening
1 cup cold water

Combine ham, onion, tomato sauce, parsley, pepper, mustard, and horseradish.

Make pastry as follows: Sift flour and salt together. Cut in shortening until the mixture is granular. Add water a little at a time and mix lightly with a fork. Roll out dough on a lightly floured board to ⅛-inch thickness. Cut into rounds or squares about 5 inches across.

Place about 2½ tablespoons of ham mixture on each piece of pastry. Fold pastry over from center, forming a half-moon or triangle. Crimp edges of pastry together with a fork.

To serve immediately. Bake at 400° F. (hot oven) for 25 minutes. Serve peas or celery in cream sauce over the turnovers.

To freeze. Wrap unbaked turnovers individually in the freezer packaging material and pack in cardboard cartons. Or pack in layers in moisture-proof freezer containers, separating the layers with two sheets of cellophane or other moisture-vapor-resistant material. Seal and freeze.

To prepare for serving. Remove the wrapping, place turnovers on a baking sheet, and bake at 400° F. (hot oven) for 30 minutes.

Menu suggestion. Serve peas or celery in cream sauce over the turnovers. Assorted raw vegetables, baked sweetpotatoes, and cinnamon apples might complete the menu.

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Pork savory

25 portions, ¾ cup each

3 pounds lean pork, cut in 1-inch pieces
1½ teaspoons salt
½ teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon fat or oil
3 cups water
2½ cups sliced carrots
1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
3 cups sour cream
3½ cups diced potatoes
1 tablespoon finely chopped onion
1½ cups green lima beans
1 tablespoon salt

Sprinkle the pork with salt and pepper. Brown the meat in the fat or oil, add water, cover, and simmer until the meat is tender.

Cook the carrots in a little water until almost tender.

Combine flour and sour cream; beat until smooth. Combine with meat and broth.

Add the vegetables and salt and blend well.

To serve immediately. Bake covered at 375° F. (moderate oven) for 1 hour; remove the cover and continue baking for about 30 minutes to brown the top.

To freeze. Bake covered at 375° F. (moderate oven) for 1 hour. Cool quickly. Pack in freezer containers, leaving head space (p. 4). Seal and freeze immediately.

To prepare for serving. Bake uncovered at 400° F. (hot oven) until the food is heated through, about 45 minutes for pints, 1 hour for quarts.

Or reheat in a saucepan over low heat, or in the top of a double boiler, stirring as needed to prevent sticking.

Menu suggestion. A tossed green salad, spiced crabapples, and peach betty go well with this main dish.

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MEAT LOAVES

You can make a meat loaf that is to be frozen by any good meat loaf recipe. Just make enough for several meals instead of one and freeze the extra loaves. For a change from the usual meat loaf, try this cheese meat loaf or jellied ham loaf.

Cheese meat loaf

25 slices, each about ¾ by 1½ by 4 inches

2½ pounds ground beef
1 cup chopped cheese
3 tablespoons chopped green pepper
⅔ cup chopped onion
2½ cups dry breadcrumbs
1 tablespoon salt
½ small bay leaf, crushed
¼ teaspoon thyme
Dash of garlic salt
3 eggs, beaten
2½ cups tomato puree

Mix the beef, cheese, green pepper, onion, crumbs, and seasonings thoroughly. Combine eggs and tomatoes, and blend into meat mixture.

To serve immediately. Place meat mixture in loaf pan. Bake at 350° F. (moderate oven) for about 1 hour.

To freeze. Meat loaf may be frozen unbaked or baked.

Wrap unbaked meat loaf in moisture-resistant packaging material. Or put mixture in metal freezer containers or loaf pans; cover with lids or wrap in packaging material. Seal and freeze.

For frozen baked meat loaf, bake mixture in metal freezer containers or loaf pans at 350° F. (moderate oven) for about 1 hour. Cool quickly. Cover or wrap as above. Seal and freeze.

To prepare for serving. Bake frozen uncooked meat loaf uncovered at 350° F. (moderate oven) for about 1½ hours or until done.

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Cover frozen baked meat loaf with tomato sauce or gravy made from meat drippings and reheat at 400° F. (hot oven) for about 1 hour. Or, if preferred, thaw frozen baked meat loaf in the refrigerator, slice, and serve cold. Or cover slices with gravy or sauce and reheat in a saucepan over low heat.

Menu suggestion. Serve with tomato or mushroom sauce, parsley potatoes, baked spinach, and cherry tarts.

Jellied ham loaf

25 portions, 1 by 4 by 4 inches

5 tablespoons unflavored gelatin
1 cup cold water
1½ quarts coarsely ground lean cooked ham
3 cups chopped celery
1½ teaspoons onion juice
¾ teaspoon powdered horseradish
¾ cup mayonnaise
1½ cups cooked salad dressing (p. 19)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
¾ teaspoon prepared mustard
¾ cup sliced stuffed olives

Soak gelatin in cold water for 5 minutes. Place over hot water until dissolved. Combine all ingredients. Mix well.

To serve immediately. Place in a loaf pan of desired size. Garnish with sliced hard-cooked eggs. Chill until firm, slice, and serve on crisp salad greens.

To freeze. Place in loaf pans or freezer containers. Chill until firm. Cover with lids or wrap in freezer packaging material. Seal and freeze.

To prepare for serving. Thaw, without unwrapping, in the refrigerator. Garnish with sliced hard-cooked eggs, slice, and serve on crisp salad greens.

Menu suggestion. Serve with buttered lima beans and sliced tomatoes, and apple pie a la mode for dessert.

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HEARTY BEAN DISHES

Cooked dry beans freeze especially well. Because freezing, like cooking, softens beans somewhat, cook them until barely tender for the best quality frozen product.

Baked beans

25 portions, 1 cup each

2¼ quarts (4 pounds) dry beans, Great Northern or pea
4 quarts boiling water
¾ pound salt pork, sliced
¼ teaspoon red pepper
1 cup brown sugar, well packed
3½ teaspoons powdered dry mustard
2 tablespoons salt
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup molasses

Add beans to boiling water and boil 2 minutes. Remove from heat and soak in the hot water 1 hour. Or if more convenient, soak overnight after the 2-minute boil.

Drain beans and heat the drained liquid. Place beans in beanpots or other covered baking dishes with a slice of salt pork in the center of each. Top with slices of salt pork.

Combine seasonings, onion, and molasses and pour over beans. Add hot bean liquid. Additional water may be needed as the beans bake.

To serve immediately. Cover and bake at 300° F. (slow oven) for 6 hours or until the beans are tender.

To freeze. Bake the beans covered at 300° F. (slow oven) for 5 hours or until nearly done. Cool quickly. Pack in freezer containers, leaving head space (p. 4). Seal and freeze immediately.

To prepare for serving. Add a small amount of water to the beans and reheat in a saucepan over low heat, stirring frequently to prevent 16sticking. Or reheat in the top of a double boiler. Or bake at 400° F. (hot oven) until beans are heated through, about 45 minutes for pints, 1 hour for quarts.

Menu suggestion. Serve with coleslaw, brown bread, and lemon sponge pudding.

Barbecued lima beans

16 portions, ¾ cup each

4½ cups (2 pounds) baby lima beans, dry
2 quarts boiling water
½ pound chopped salt pork or bacon
1 cup chopped onion
1¼ teaspoons minced garlic
3 tablespoons prepared mustard
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons chili powder
2½ cups condensed tomato soup
¼ cup vinegar
4 teaspoons brown sugar
2 cups bean liquid

Add beans to boiling water and boil 2 minutes. Remove from heat and soak in the hot water 1 hour. Or if more convenient, soak overnight after the 2-minute boil. Boil beans gently in the soaking liquid until almost done (about 40 minutes).

Brown the salt pork or bacon, onion, and garlic. Add mustard, salt, worcestershire sauce, chili powder, tomato soup, vinegar, sugar, and beans and bean liquid.

To serve immediately. Pour into greased baking dish or pan. Bake at 400° F. (hot oven) for 30 minutes.

To freeze. Cool the beans quickly. Pack in freezer containers, leaving head space (p. 4). Seal and freeze immediately.

To prepare for serving. Proceed as for baked beans, page 15.

Menu suggestion. Serve with asparagus salad garnished with pimiento strips, and orange bavarian cream for dessert.

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Ham and bean scallop

25 portions, 1 cup each

1¾ quarts (3 pounds) dry pea beans
3 quarts boiling water
5 cups cooked ham, diced
½ cup ham fat
1½ cups finely chopped onion
½ cup sifted all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons powdered dry mustard
2 teaspoons salt
2 quarts milk
3 cups grated cheese

Add beans to boiling water and boil 2 minutes. Remove from heat and soak in the hot water 1 hour. Or if more convenient, soak overnight after the 2-minute boil. Cook beans in the soaking liquid about 1½ hours (slightly underdone).

Heat the fat, add onion, and cook until golden brown. Add flour, worcestershire sauce, mustard, and salt, blending to a smooth paste. Stir in the milk. Cook until thickened, stirring constantly. Combine cheese, ham, and beans with the sauce. Remove from heat.

To serve immediately. Pour enough of the mixture for one meal into a greased baking dish or pan. Top with ½ cup fine dry breadcrumbs and bake at 350° F. (moderate oven) about 20 minutes, or until crumbs are golden brown.

To freeze. Cool the food quickly. Pack in freezer containers, leaving head space (p. 4). Seal and freeze immediately.

To prepare for serving. Reheat in the top of a double boiler, stirring occasionally to speed thawing. Or, if food is frozen in an ovenproof container, uncover, top with fine dry breadcrumbs, and bake at 400° F. (hot oven) about 45 minutes for pints, 1 hour for quarts.

Menu suggestion. Serve with brussels sprouts, stewed tomatoes, and celery sticks, have sauteed peach halves for dessert.

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Beans and sausage, Mexican style

25 portions, 1 cup each

1½ quarts (2½ pounds) dry kidney beans
4½ quarts boiling water
1 quart chopped onion
1¼ cups chopped green pepper
1 tablespoon minced garlic
4 pounds bulk pork sausage
1 quart bean liquid
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons chili powder (or to taste)
2 quarts canned tomatoes
½ cup sifted all-purpose flour

Add beans to boiling water and boil 2 minutes. Remove from heat and soak in the hot water 1 hour. Or if more convenient, soak overnight after the 2-minute boil. Cook beans in the soaking liquid about 1 hour (slightly underdone). Drain; save the liquid and if necessary add water to make 1 quart.

Combine onion, green pepper, garlic, and sausage. Cook until sausage is light brown, breaking it up as it cooks. Add beans, bean liquid, salt, chili powder, and tomatoes, reserving ½ cup tomato liquid. Blend flour with reserved tomato liquid and add to bean mixture. Blend well. Simmer until thickened (about 30 minutes), stirring frequently to prevent sticking.

To serve immediately. Simmer until beans are tender. Serve on mounds of fluffy rice.

To freeze. Cool the bean and sausage mixture quickly. Pack in freezer containers, leaving head space (p. 4). Seal and freeze immediately.

To prepare for serving. Add a small amount of water and reheat in a saucepan over low heat, stirring frequently to prevent sticking. Or reheat in the top of a double boiler. Or bake at 400° F. (hot oven) until the food is heated through, about 45 minutes for pints, 1 hour for quarts.

Menu suggestion. Serve plain or on rice, with tossed green salad and french bread, and for dessert have pineapple sherbet.

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Cooked salad dressing for jellied ham loaf

¼ cup sugar
2 teaspoons flour
¾ teaspoon salt
¾ teaspoon powdered dry mustard
Few grains cayenne
⅛ teaspoon pepper
1½ teaspoons butter or margarine, melted
¾ cup milk
6 tablespoons vinegar
2 eggs, slightly beaten

Mix sugar, flour, and seasonings.

Stir butter or margarine into the dry ingredients gradually. Slowly blend in the milk, then the vinegar.

Cook over hot water until mixture thickens, stirring occasionally. Stir a little of the hot mixture into the egg and add to rest of mixture. Cook 3 minutes, stirring constantly.

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INDEX TO RECIPES

Page
Baked beans15
Barbecued lima beans16
Beans and sausage, Mexican style18
Cheese meat loaf13
Chicken a la king7
Creamed chicken6
Ham and bean scallop17
Ham turnovers11
Jellied ham loaf14
Lamb or beef pie9
Pastry topping for lamb or beef pie10
Pork savory12
Salad dressing, cooked, for jellied ham loaf19
Turkey-macaroni casserole8

MORE INFORMATION

Order No.
Home Freezing of Fruits and VegetablesG 10
Home Freezers . . . Their Selection and UseG 48
Home Care of Purchased Frozen FoodsG 69
Home Freezing of PoultryG 70
Freezing Meat and Fish in the HomeG 93

These publications are available from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250.

This is a
Consumer Service
of USDA

Human Nutrition Research Division
Agricultural Research Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C.
Issued July 1954
Revised April 1965

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:1965—O-763-705


For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office. Washington. D.C. 20402—Price 10 cents

Transcriber’s Notes

  • Silently corrected a few typos, including listed errata.
  • Retained publication information from the printed edition: this eBook is public-domain in the country of publication.
  • In the text versions only, text in italics is delimited by _underscores_.