Index of Project Gutenberg Works on Black History by Various

INDEX OF PROJECT GUTENBERG

WORKS ON

BLACK HISTORY

Compiled by David Widger


CONTENTS

Click on the ## before many of the titles to view a linked
table of contents for that volume.

Click on the title itself to open the original online file.

## THE JOURNAL OF NEGRO HISTORY, Vol. 1. Jan. 1916 Various
## THE JOURNAL OF NEGRO HISTORY, Vol. 2, 1917 Various
## THE JOURNAL OF NEGRO HISTORY, Vol. 3, 1918 Various
## THE JOURNAL OF NEGRO HISTORY, Vol. 4, 1919 Various
## THE JOURNAL OF NEGRO HISTORY, Vol. 5, 1920 Various
## OUR WORLD, or THE SLAVEHOLDERS DAUGHTER F. Colburn Adams
## NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS Frederick Douglass
## OTHER ARTICLES BY FREDERICK DOUGLASS Frederick Douglass
## MY BONDAGE AND MY FREEDOM Frederick Douglass
  JOHN BROWN Frederick Douglass
  ABOLITION FANATICISM IN NEW YORK Frederick Douglass
## THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK W.E.B. Du Bois
## DARKWATER, VOICES FROM WITHIN THE VEIL W.E.B. Du Bois
## THE QUEST OF THE SILVER FLEECE W.E.B. Du Bois
## THE NEGRO W.E.B. Du Bois
## SUPPRESSION OF THE AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE TO THE USA W.E.B. Du Bois
  THE CONSERVATION OF RACES W.E.B. Du Bois
## UP FROM SLAVERY AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY B.T. Washington
## THE NEGRO PROBLEM B.T. Washington
## A NEGRO EXPLORER AT THE NORTH POLE B.T. Washington
## THE FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN NEGRO B.T. Washington
## TUSKEGEE & ITS PEOPLE B.T. Washington
## SHADOW AND LIGHT B.T. Washington
## THE NEGRO IN THE SOUTH B.T. Washington
  THE STORY OF SLAVERY B.T. Washington
## THE NEGRO IN THE SOUTH B.T. Washington
## FROM SLAVE TO COLLEGE PRESIDENT Pike
## UNDERGROUND RAILROAD FROM SLAVERY TO FREEDOM Siebert
## THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD Still
## CLOTELLE Brown
## ESCAPE OF WM. WELLS BROWN FROM SLAVERY Brown
## NARRATIVE OF WILLIAM W. BROWN, A FUGITIVE SLAVE Brown
## DRED, A TALE OF THE GREAT DISMAL SWAMP Stowe
## UNCLE TOM’S CABIN Stowe
## STEP BY STEP American Tract
## THE IRON FURNACE Aughey
## A SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN NEGRO Brawley
## CAPTAIN CANOT, TWENTY YEARS A SLAVER Canot
## THE WHITE SLAVES OF ENGLAND Cobden
## THE BLACK EXPERIENCE IN AMERICA Coombs
## WHERE THE TWAIN MEET Gaunt
## FATHER HENSON’S STORY OF HIS LIFE Henson
## BLACK REBELLION, FIVE REVOLTS Higginson
## THIRTY YEARS A SLAVE Hughes
## INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL Jacobs
## 30 YEARS A SLAVE; 4 YEARS IN THE WHITE HOUSE Keckley
## THE SLAVERY QUESTION Lawrence
## JOURNAL OF A WEST INDIA PROPRIETOR Lewis
## THE NEGRO AND THE NATION Merriam
## THE SEA-WITCH Murray
## TWELVE YEARS A SLAVE Northup
## THE BROTHERS’ WAR Reed
## THE BOY SLAVES Reid
## TWENTY-TWO YEARS A SLAVE Steward
## THE STORY OF MATTIE J. JACKSON Thompson
## POEMS Wheatley
  LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF HENRY BIBB Bibb
  THE LIFE OF HARRIET TUBMAN Bradford

 

 


TABLES OF CONTENTS OF VOLUMES

 


 

POEMS

ON VARIOUS SUBJECTS,

By Phillis Wheatley

(Negro Servant To Mr. John Wheatley, Of Boston, In New-England)

1771

CONTENTS

PREFACE.
TO THE PUBLIC.
P O E M S
TO  M AE C E N A S.
O N  V I R T U E.
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, IN NEW-ENGLAND.
TO THE KING’S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY. 1768.
ON BEING BROUGHT FROM AFRICA TO AMERICA.
ON THE DEATH OF THE REV. DR. SEWELL, 1769.
ON THE DEATH OF THE REV. MR. GEORGE WHITEFIELD. 1770.
ON THE DEATH OF A YOUNG LADY OF FIVE YEARS OF AGE.
ON THE DEATH OF A YOUNG GENTLEMAN.
TO A LADY ON THE DEATH OF HER HUSBAND.
G O L I A T H  O F  G A T H.
THOUGHTS ON THE WORKS OF PROVIDENCE.
TO A LADY ON THE DEATH OF THREE RELATIONS.
TO A CLERGYMAN ON THE DEATH OF HIS LADY.
AN HYMN TO THE MORNING
AN HYMN TO THE EVENING.
ISAIAH lxiii. 1-8.
ON RECOLLECTION.
ON IMAGINATION.
A FUNERAL POEM ON THE DEATH OF C. E. AN INFANT OF TWELVE MONTHS.
TO CAPTAIN H———D, OF THE 65TH REGIMENT.
TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM, EARL OF DARTMOUTH
O D E  T O  N E P T U N E.
TO A LADY ON HER COMING TO NORTH-AMERICA WITH HER SON, FOR THE RECOVERY OF HER HEALTH.
TO A LADY ON HER REMARKABLE PRESERVATION IN AN HURRICANE IN NORTH-CAROLINA.
TO A LADY AND HER CHILDREN, ON THE DEATH OF HER SON AND THEIR BROTHER.
TO A GENTLEMAN AND LADY ON THE DEATH OF THE LADY’S BROTHER AND SISTER, AND A CHILD OF THE NAME OF AVIS, AGED ONE YEAR.
ON THE DEATH OF DR. SAMUEL MARSHALL. 1771.
TO A GENTLEMAN ON HIS VOYAGE TO GREAT-BRITAIN FOR THE RECOVERY OF HIS HEALTH.
TO THE REV. DR. THOMAS AMORY, ON READING HIS SERMONS ON DAILY DEVOTION, IN WHICH THAT DUTY IS RECOMMENDED AND ASSISTED.
ON THE DEATH OF J. C. AN INFANT.
AN  H Y M N  TO  H U M A N I T Y. TO S. P. G. ESQ;
TO THE HONOURABLE T. H. ESQ; ON THE DEATH OF HIS DAUGHTER.
NIOBE IN DISTRESS FOR HER CHILDREN SLAIN BY APOLLO, FROM OVID’S METAMORPHOSES, BOOK VI. AND FROM A VIEW OF THE PAINTING OF MR. RICHARD WILSON.
TO S. M. A YOUNG AFRICAN PAINTER, ON SEEING HIS WORKS.
TO HIS HONOUR THE LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR, ON THE DEATH OF HIS LADY. MARCH 24, 1773.
A FAREWEL TO AMERICA. TO MRS. S. W.
A REBUS, BY I. B.
AN ANSWER TO THE REBUS, BY THE AUTHOR OF THESE POEMS.


 

NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS

AN AMERICAN SLAVE. WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

 

CONTENTS

PREFACE
LETTER FROM WENDELL PHILLIPS, ESQ.
FREDERICK DOUGLASS.
CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
APPENDIX
A PARODY

 


 

ADDITIONAL PROJECT GUTENBERG
COLLECTED ARTICLES

By Frederick Douglass

CONTENTS

MY ESCAPE FROM SLAVERY
RECONSTRUCTION

 


 

MY BONDAGE and MY FREEDOM

By Frederick Douglass

CONTENTS

MY BONDAGE and MY FREEDOM
EDITOR’S PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER I. Childhood
CHAPTER II. Removed from My First Home
CHAPTER III. Parentage
CHAPTER IV. A General Survey of the Slave Plantation
CHAPTER V. Gradual Initiation to the Mysteries of Slavery
CHAPTER VI. Treatment of Slaves on Lloyd’s Plantation
CHAPTER VII. Life in the Great House
CHAPTER VIII. A Chapter of Horrors
CHAPTER IX. Personal Treatment
CHAPTER X. Life in Baltimore
CHAPTER XI. “A Change Came O’er the Spirit of My Dream”
CHAPTER XII. Religious Nature Awakened
CHAPTER XIII. The Vicissitudes of Slave Life
CHAPTER XIV. Experience in St. Michael’s
CHAPTER XV. Covey, the Negro Breaker
CHAPTER XVI. Another Pressure of the Tyrant’s Vice
CHAPTER XVII. The Last Flogging
CHAPTER XVIII. New Relations and Duties
CHAPTER XIX. The Run-Away Plot
CHAPTER XX. Apprenticeship Life
CHAPTER XXI. My Escape from Slavery
LIFE as a FREEMAN
CHAPTER XXII. Liberty Attained
CHAPTER XXIII. Introduced to the Abolitionists
CHAPTER XXIV. Twenty-One Months in Great Britain
CHAPTER XXV. Various Incidents
RECEPTION SPEECH [10]. At Finsbury Chapel, Moorfields, England, May 12,
Dr. Campbell’s Reply
LETTER TO HIS OLD MASTER. [11]. To My Old Master, Thomas Auld
THE NATURE OF SLAVERY. Extract from a Lecture on Slavery, at Rochester,
INHUMANITY OF SLAVERY. Extract from A Lecture on Slavery, at Rochester,
WHAT TO THE SLAVE IS THE FOURTH OF JULY?. Extract from an Oration, at
THE INTERNAL SLAVE TRADE. Extract from an Oration, at Rochester, July
THE SLAVERY PARTY. Extract from a Speech Delivered before the A. A. S.
THE ANTI-SLAVERY MOVEMENT. Extracts from a Lecture before Various
FOOTNOTES

 


 

UP FROM SLAVERY: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

By Booker T. Washington

CONTENTS

  Preface
  Introduction
  UP FROM SLAVERY
Chapter I   A Slave Among Slaves
Chapter II   Boyhood Days
Chapter III   The Struggle For An Education
Chapter IV   Helping Others
Chapter V   The Reconstruction Period
Chapter VI   Black Race And Red Race
Chapter VII   Early Days At Tuskegee
Chapter VIII   Teaching School In A Stable And A Hen-House
Chapter IX   Anxious Days And Sleepless Nights
Chapter X   A Harder Task Than Making Bricks Without Straw
Chapter XI   Making Their Beds Before They Could Lie On Them
Chapter XII   Raising Money
Chapter XIII   Two Thousand Miles For A Five-Minute Speech
Chapter XIV   The Atlanta Exposition Address
Chapter XV   The Secret Of Success In Public Speaking
Chapter XVI   Europe
Chapter XVII      Last Words

 


 

THE NEGRO PROBLEM

By Booker T. Washington and Others

CONTENTS

I Industrial Education for the Negro
  Booker T. Washington 7
II The Talented Tenth
  W.E. Burghardt DuBois 31
III The Disfranchisement of the Negro
  Charles W. Chesnutt 77
IV The Negro and the Law
  Wilford H. Smith 125
V The Characteristics of the Negro People
  H.T. Kealing 161
VI Representative American Negroes
  Paul Laurence Dunbar 187
VII The Negro’s Place in American Life at the Present Day
  T. Thomas Fortune 211

 


 

A NEGRO EXPLORER AT THE NORTH POLE

By Matthew A. Henson

With A Foreword By Robert E. Peary
Rear Admiral, U. S. N., Retired

And An Introduction By Booker T. Washington

CONTENTS

  page
Foreword v
Introduction xv
CHAPTER I
The Early Years: Schoolboy, Cabin-Boy, Seaman, and Lieutenant Peary’s Body-Servant—First Trips to the Arctic 1
CHAPTER II
Off for the Pole—How the Other Explorers Looked—The Lamb-Like Esquimos—Arrival at Etah 15
CHAPTER III
Finding of Rudolph Franke—Whitney Landed—Trading and Coaling—Fighting the Ice-packs 26
CHAPTER IV
[x]Preparing for Winter at Cape Sheridan—The Arctic Library 35
CHAPTER V
Making Peary Sledges—Hunting in the Arctic Night—the Excitable Dogs and Their Habits 40
CHAPTER VI
The Peary Plan—a Rain of Rocks—My Friends, the Esquimos 46
CHAPTER VII
Sledging to Cape Columbia—Hot Soldering in Cold Weather 52
CHAPTER VIII
In Camp at Columbia—Literary Igloos—The Magnificent Desolation of the Arctic 62
CHAPTER IX
Ready for the Dash to the Pole—The Commander’s Arrival 70
CHAPTER X
Forward! March! 75
CHAPTER XI
[xi]Fighting up the Polar Sea—Held up by the “Big Lead” 78
CHAPTER XII
Pioneering the Way—Breaking Sledges 93
CHAPTER XIII
The Supporting-Parties Begin to Turn Back 103
CHAPTER XIV
Bartlett’s Farthest North—His Quiet Good-By 116
CHAPTER XV
The Pole! 127
CHAPTER XVI
The Fast Trek Back to Land 140
CHAPTER XVII
Safe on the Roosevelt—Poor Marvin 145
CHAPTER XVIII
After Musk-Oxen—The Doctor’s Scientific Expedition 153
CHAPTER XIX
[xii]The Roosevelt Starts for Home—Esquimo Villages—New Dogs and New Dog Fights 161
CHAPTER XX
Two Narrow Escapes—Arrival at Etah—Harry Whitney—Dr. Cook’s Claims 170
CHAPTER XXI
Etah to New York—Coming of Mail and Reporters—Home! 180

Appendix I—Notes on the Esquimos
189

Appendix II—List of Smith Sound Esquimos
196

ILLUSTRATIONS

matthew a. henson Frontispiece
nothing facing
page
robert e. peary in his north pole furs 76
the four north pole esquimos 77
camp morris k. jesup at the north pole 122
matthew a. henson immediately after the sledge journey to the pole and back 123
the “roosevelt” in winter quarters at cape sheridan 138
matthew a. henson in his north pole furs, taken after his return to civilization 139

 


 

THE FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN NEGRO

By Booker T. Washington

CONTENTS

Chapter I. Page 3

First appearance of Negroes in America—Rapid increase—Conditions during Civil War—During the reconstruction.

Chapter II. Page 16

Responsibility of the whole country for the Negro—Progress in the past—Same methods of education do not fit all cases—Proved in the case of the Southern Negro—Illustrations—Lack of money—Comparison between outlay for schools North and South—Duty of North to South.

Chapter III. Page 42

Decadence of Southern plantation—Demoralization of Negroes natural—No home life before the war—Too much classical education at the start—Lack of practical training—Illustrations—The well-trained slaves now dead—Former plantations as industrial schools—The decayed plantation built up by a former slave—Misunderstanding of industrial education.

Chapter IV. Page 67

The Negroes’ proper use of education—Hayti, Santo Domingo, and Liberia as illustrations of the lack of practical training—Present necessity for union of all forces to further the cause of industrial education—Industrial education not opposed to the higher education—Results of practical training so far—Little or no prejudice against capable Negroes in business in the South—The Negro at first shunned labor as degrading—Hampton and Tuskegee aim to remove this feeling—The South does not oppose industrial education for the Negroes—Address to Tuskegee students setting forth the necessity of steadfastness of purpose.

Chapter V. Page 106

The author’s early life—At Hampton—The inception of the Tuskegee School in 1881—Its growth—Scope—Size at present—Expenses—Purposes—Methods—Building of the chapel—Work of the graduates—Similar schools beginning throughout the South—Tuskegee Negro Conference—The Workers’ Conference—Tuskegee as a trainer of teachers.

Chapter VI. Page 127

The Negro race in politics—Its patriotic zeal in 1776—In 1814—In the Civil War—In the Spanish War—Politics attempted too soon after freedom—Poor leaders—Two parties in the South, the blacks’ and the whites’—Not necessarily opposed in interests—The Negro should give up no rights—The same tests for the restriction of the franchise should be applied alike to both blacks and whites—This is not the case—Education and the franchise—The whites must help the blacks to pure votes—Rioting and lynching only to be stopped by mutual confidence.

Chapter VII. Page 157

Difficulty of fusion—Africa impossible as a refuge because already completely claimed by other nations—Comparison of Negro race with white—Physical condition of the Negro—Present lack of ability to organize—Weaknesses—Ability to work—Trustworthiness—Desire to rise—Obstructions put in the way of Negroes’ advancement—Results of oppression—Necessity for encouragement and self-respect—Comparison of Negroes’[Pg x] position and that of the Jews—Lynching—Non-interference of the North—Increase of lynching—Statistics of numbers, races, places, causes of violence—Uselessness of lynching in preventing crime—Fairness in carrying out the laws—Increase of crime among the Negroes—Reason for it—Responsibility of both races.

Chapter VIII. Page 200

Population—Emigration to the North—Morality North and South—Dangers: 1. incendiary advice; 2. mob violence; 3. discouragement; 4. newspaper exaggeration; 5. lack of education; 6. bad legislation—Negroes must identify with best interests of the South—Unwise missionary work—Wise missionary work—Opportunity for industrial education—The good standing of business-educated Negroes in the South—Religion and morality—Justice and appreciation coming for the Negro race as it proves itself worthy.

 


 

TUSKEGEE AND ITS PEOPLE

By Booker T. Washington

CONTENTS

  PAGE
GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1
By Booker T. Washington.
 
PART I
THE SCHOOL AND ITS PURPOSES
 
I.—PRESENT ACHIEVEMENTS AND GOVERNING IDEALS 19
By Emmett J. Scott, Mr. Washington’s Executive Secretary.
II.—RESOURCES AND MATERIAL EQUIPMENT 35
By Warren Logan, Treasurer of the School.
III.—THE ACADEMIC AIMS 56
By Roscoe C. Bruce, Director of the Academic Department.
IV.—WHAT GIRLS ARE TAUGHT, AND HOW 68
By Mrs. Booker T. Washington, Director of Industries for Girls.
V.—HAMPTON INSTITUTE’S RELATION TO TUSKEGEE 87
By Robert R. Moton.
 
PART II
AUTOBIOGRAPHIES BY GRADUATES OF THE SCHOOL
 
I.—A COLLEGE PRESIDENT’S STORY 101
By Isaac Fisher, of Pine Bluff, Arkansas.
II.—A SCHOOL PRINCIPAL’S STORY 111
By William H. Holtzclaw, of Utica, Mississippi.
III.—A LAWYER’S STORY 141
By George W. Lovejoy, of Mobile, Alabama.
IV.—A SCHOOL TREASURER’S STORY 152
By Martin A. Menafee, of Denmark, South Carolina.
V.—THE STORY OF A FARMER 164
By Frank Reid, of Dawkins, Alabama.
VI.—THE STORY OF A CARPENTER 173
By Gabriel B. Miller, of Fort Valley, Georgia.
VII.—COTTON-GROWING IN AFRICA 184
By John W. Robinson, of Lome, Togo, West Africa.
VIII.—THE STORY OF A TEACHER OF COOKING 200
By Mary L. Dotson, of Tuskegee Institute, Alabama.
IX.—A WOMAN’S WORK 211
By Cornelia Bowen, of Waugh (Mt. Meigs), Alabama.
X.—UPLIFTING OF THE SUBMERGED MASSES 224
By W. J. Edwards, of Snow Hill, Alabama.
XI.—A DAIRYMAN’S STORY 253
By Lewis A. Smith, of Rockford, Illinois.
XII.—THE STORY OF A WHEELWRIGHT 264
By Edward Lomax, of Tuskegee Institute, Alabama.
XIII.—THE STORY OF A BLACKSMITH 276
By Jubie B. Bragg, of Tallahassee, Florida.
XIV.—A DRUGGIST’S STORY 285
By David L. Johnston, of Birmingham, Alabama.
XV.—THE STORY OF A SUPERVISOR OF MECHANICAL INDUSTRIES 299
By James M. Canty, of Institute P. O., West Virginia.
XVI.—A NEGRO COMMUNITY BUILDER 317
By Russell C. Calhoun, of Eatonville, Florida.
XVII.—THE EVOLUTION OF A SHOEMAKER 338
By Charles L. Marshall, of Cambria, Virginia.

ILLUSTRATIONS

  FACING
PAGE
BOOKER T. WASHINGTON Frontispiece
EMMETT J. SCOTT 20
Mr. Washington’s Executive Secretary.
THE COLLIS P. HUNTINGTON MEMORIAL BUILDING 26
WARREN LOGAN 36
Treasurer of the School
THE OFFICE BUILDING IN PROCESS OF ERECTION 50
Student carpenters shown at work.
ROSCOE C. BRUCE 56
Director of the Academic Department.
A PORTION OF THE SCHOOL GROUNDS 64
ANOTHER PORTION OF THE SCHOOL GROUNDS 66
MRS. BOOKER T. WASHINGTON 68
Director of Industries for Girls.
A CLASS IN MILLINERY 76
THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 94
Standing, left to right: P. C. Parks, Superintendent of Farm; George
W. Carver, Director, Agricultural Department; J. N. Calloway,
Land Extension; John H. Palmer, Registrar; Charles H. Gibson,
Resident Auditor; Edgar J. Penney, Chaplain.
Seated, left to right: Lloyd G. Wheeler, Business Agent; Robert R.
Taylor, Director of Mechanical Industries; John H. Washington,
General Superintendent of Industries; Warren Logan, Treasurer;
Booker T. Washington, Principal; Miss Jane E. Clark, Dean of
Woman’s Department; Mrs. Booker T. Washington, Director of Industries
for Girls; and Emmett J. Scott, Secretary to the Principal.
The Director of the Academic Department, Roscoe C. Bruce, and the
Commandant of Cadets, Major J. B. Ramsey, also members of
the Executive Council, were absent when photograph was taken.
THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY BUILDING 108
MORNING AT THE BARNS ON THE SCHOOL FARM 122
Teams of horses and cattle ready to start for the day’s work.
STUDENTS PRUNING PEACH-TREES 146
A SILO ON THE FARM 166
Students filling it with fodder corn, steam-power being used.
A MODEL DINING-ROOM 208
From the department where table-service is taught.
THE CULTURE OF BEES 220
Students at work in the apiary.
IN THE DAIRY 254
Students using separators.
STUDENTS AT WORK IN THE HARNESS SHOP 270
AT THE HOSPITAL 294
A corner in the boys’ ward.
IN THE TIN SHOP 300
STUDENTS CANNING FRUIT 308
STARTING A NEW BUILDING 314
Student masons laying the foundation in brick.
GIRLS GARDENING 344

 


 

SHADOW and LIGHT

AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

With Reminiscences Of The Last And Present Century.

By Mifflin Wistar Gibbs

With An Introduction By Booker T. Washington

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I 3 Parents, School and Teacher—Foundation of the Negroes’ Mechanical Knowledge—First Brick A. M. E. Church—Bishop Allen—Olive Cemetery—Harriet Smith Home—”Underground Railroad”—Incidents on the Road—William and Ellen Craft—William Box Brown.
CHAPTER II 15 Nat Turner’s Insurrection—Experience on a Maryland Plantation—First Street Cars in Philadelphia—Anti-Slavery Meetings—Amusing Incidents—Opposition of Negro Churches—Kossuth Celebration, and the Unwelcome Guest.
CHAPTER III 29 Cinguez, the Hero of Armistead Captives—The Threshold of Man’s Estate—My First Lecturing Tour with Frederic Douglass—His “Life and Times”—Pen Picture of George William Curtis of Ante-Bellum Conditions—Harriet Beecher Stowe, Lucretia Mott, and Frances E. Harper, a Noble Band of Women—”Go Do Some Great Thing”—Journey to California—Incidents at Panama.
CHAPTER IV 40 Arrival at San Francisco—Getting Domiciled and Seeking Work—Strike of White Employees—Lester & Gibbs, Importers—Assaulted in Our Store—First Protest from the Colored Men of California—Poll Tax.
CHAPTER V 51 “Vigilance Committee” and Lynch Law at “Fort Gunny”—Murder of James King, of William—A Paradox to Present Conditions.
CHAPTER VI 59 Gold Discovery in British Columbia—Incidents on Shipboard and Arrival at Victoria—National Unrest in 1859—”Irrepressible Conflict”—Garrison and Douglass—Harriet Beecher Stowe and Frances Ellen Harper—John Brown of Harper’s Ferry—”Fugitive Slave Law”—Flight to Canada.
CHAPTER VII 74 Abraham Lincoln President—Rebellion Inaugurated—Success of the Union Army—Re-Election of Lincoln—Bravery and Endurance of Negro Soldiers—Assassination of Lincoln—Lynching Denounced by Southern Governors and Statesmen—Words of Wisdom from St. Pierre de Couberton.
CHAPTER VIII 85 My First Entry Into Political Life—Intricacies of the Ballot—Number of Negro Schools, Pupils and Amount of School Property in 1898—Amendment to Constitution and Interview with Vice-President Schuyler Colfax at Victoria, B. C.—William Lloyd Garrison, Jr., and James Russell Lowell on the Right to Vote.
CHAPTER IX 93 Philip A. Bell, a Veteran Editor of the “Negro Press”—British Columbia, Its Early History, Efforts for Annexation to the United States—Meeting with Lady Franklin, Widow of Sir John Franklin, the Arctic Explorer, in 1859—Union of British Columbia with the Dominion of Canada in 1868, the Political Issue—Queen Charlotte Island—Anthracite Coal Company—Director, Contractor and Shipper of First Cargo of Anthracite Coal on the Pacific Coast—Indians and Their Peculiarities.
CHAPTER X 107 An Incident of Peril—My Return to the United States in 1869—Thoughts and Feelings En Route—Entered Oberlin Law College and Graduated—Visit to my Brother, J. C. Gibbs, Secretary of State of Florida—A Delegate to the National Convention of Colored Men at Charleston, S. C.—”Gratitude Expensive”—The Trend of Republican Leaders—Contribution of Southern White People for Negro Education—Views of a Leading Democrat.
CHAPTER XI 122 President of National Convention at Nashville, Tenn., in 1876—Pen and Ink Sketch by H. V. Redfield of “Cincinnati Commercial”—Colored Leaders Desire to Fraternize for Race Protection—William H. Grey, H. B. Robinson, and J. H. Johnson, of Arkansas, Leaders and Planters—My Arrival at Little Rock, May, 1871—Reading of Local Statutes in the Law Office of Benjamin & Barnes—”Wheeler & Gibbs,” Attorneys-at-Law.
CHAPTER XII 134 Politics and Politicians—Disruption of the Republicans in Arkansas—”Minstrels and Brindle Tails”—Early Canvassing in the South, with Its Peculiarities—Ku Klux Visits—My Appointment as County Attorney and Election as Municipal Judge—Hon. John Allen, of Mississippi, His Descriptive Anecdote.
CHAPTER XIII 145 Lowering Cloud on Righteous Rule—Comparison of Negro Progress—Sir Walter Scott in His Notes on English History—George C. Lorimer, a Noted Divine—Educational Solution of the Race Problem—Baron Russell, Lord Chief Justice of England—Civil War in Arkansas—Expulsion of Governor Baxter and Instalment of Governor Brooks at the State Houses—Stirring Episodes—”Who Shall Bell the Cat?”—Extraordinary Session of the Legislature—My Issue of a Search Warrant for the Seal of the State—Recognition of Baxter by the President.
CHAPTER XIV 158 Arkansas Constitutional Convention and New Constitution Adopted—Augustus H. Garland Elected Governor—My Letter from Madagascar on Learning of His Demise—General Grant’s Nomination in 1872 at the Academy of Music, Philadelphia—Oliver P. Morton, of Indiana—William H. Gray, of Arkansas—R. B. Elliot, of South Carolina—”Henry at Ajincourt”—Study of Obsolete Languages Versus Industrial Education—Views of Lord Rosebery, ex-Premier of England—Also of Washington Post—United States Have Supreme Advantages for the Negro.
CHAPTER XV 173 Presidential Elector in 1876, Receiving the Highest Vote—President Hayes, His Yearnings and Accomplishments—Protest Against Lawlessness by the Negroes in State Conventions—Negro Exodus from the Southern to the Western States in 1878—Secretary William Windom’s Letter—Hon J. C. Rapier, of Alabama, and Myself Appointed by Secretary Windom to Visit Western States and Report.
CHAPTER XVI 185 Appointed by the President in 1877 Register of U. S. Lands—Robert J. Ingersoll on the Benignity of Homestead Law—General Grant’s Tour Around the World and His Arrival at Little Rock, 1879—A Guest at the Banquet Given Him—Response to the Toast, “The Possibilities of American Citizenship”—Roscoe Conkling’s Speech Nominating General Grant for Third Term—Bronze Medal as one of the Historic “306” at the National Convention of 1880—The Manner of General Grant’s Defeat for Nomination and Garfield’s Success—Character Sketches of Hon. James G. Blaine, Ingersoll’s Mailed Warrior and Plumed Knight—Hon Grover Cleveland.
CHAPTER XVII 195 Honorary Commissioner for the Colored Exhibits of the World’s Exposition at New Orleans, La.—Neglected Opportunities—Important Factors Necessary to Recognition.
CHAPTER XVIII 201 Effort of Henry Brown, of Oberlin, Ohio, to Establish “Schools of Trade”—Call for a Conference of Leading Colored Men in 1885—Industrial Fair at Pine Bluff, Ark.—Captain Thompson, of the “Capital Guards,” a Colored Military Company—Meeting of Prominent Leaders at New Orleans—The Late N. W. Cuney, of Texas—Contented Benefactions from Christian Churches.
CHAPTER XIX 215 The Reunion of General Grant’s “306”—Ferdinand Havis, of Pine Bluff—Compromise and Disfranchisement—Progress of the Negro—”Decoration Day”—My Letter to the “Gazette”—Commission to Sell Lots of the Hot Springs Reservation—Twelve Years in the Land Service of the United States.
CHAPTER XX 223 My Appointment as U. S. Consul to Tamatave, Madagascar—My Arrival in France En Route to Paris—Called on Ambassador Porter and Consul Gowdy Relative to My “Exequator”—Visited the Louvre, the Famous Gallery of Paintings—”Follies Bergere,” or Variety Theater—The “Dome des Invalids” or the Tomb of the Great Napoleon—Mrs. Mason, of Arkansas and Washington, in Paris—Marseilles and “Hotel du Louvre”—Embarkation on French Ship “Pie Ho” for Madagascar—Scenes and Incidents En Route—”Port Said”—Visit to the “Mosque,” Mohammedan Place of Worship.
CHAPTER XXI 236 Suez Canal—The Red Sea—Pharaoh and His Hosts—Their Waterloo—Children of Israel—Travel by Sea—Arrival and Landing at Madagascar—Bubonic Plague—My Letter From Madagascar.
CHAPTER XXII 250 Island of Madagascar—Origin and Character of the Inhabitants—Their Religion and Superstitions—Physical Appearance of Madagascar—A Word Painting of Antananarivo, the Capital, by Cameron—Forms of Government—Queens of Madagascar—Slavery and Forced Labor.
CHAPTER XXIII 265 Introduction of the Christian Religion—Printing the Bible, Edict by Queen Ranavalona Against It—The New Religion “a Cloth of a Pattern She Did Not Like”—Asked the Missionaries, “Can You Make Soap?”—”Dark Days”—Persecutions and Executions for a Quarter of a Century—Examples of Christian Martyrs—Death of Queen Ranavalona—Permanent Establishment of the Christian Religion—Self-denial and Heroic Service of the Roman Catholics—Native Race Protection Committee—Forced Labor Abolished.
CHAPTER XXIV 282 Cuba and the Philippines—Their Acquisition Under the Plea of Relief From Spanish Misrule—Aguinaldo, Leader of the Filipinos—The Fidelity and Bravery of the American Negro in the Spanish War—Attestation by Many Witnesses—Industrial Education—Othello’s Occupation Gone When Polls are Closed.  
CHAPTER XXV 298 Opposition Possibly Beneficent—President McKinley’s Order for Enlistment of Colored Soldiers—General Grosvenor’s Tribute—Fifteen Thousand in the Spanish War—U. S. Supreme Court vs. The Negro—The Basis of Congressional Representation.
CHAPTER XXVI 306 Departure from Madagascar—Memories—Governor General’s Farewell Letter—Madagascar Branch of the Smithsonian Institute—Wild Animals, a Consul’s Burden—Descriptive Letter to State Department.
CHAPTER XXVII 312 Leave-taking, its Jollity and Sadness—Arrival at Camp Aden, Arabia—An Elysium for the Toper—Whisky Was Plenty, But the Water Was Out—Pleasant Visit to U. S. Consul Cunningham, of Knoxville, Tenn.—Arrival at Suez—My Visit to the U. S. Cruiser “New York”—The Urbanity of Captain Rogers—Suez Canal—Port Said—”Mal de Mer”—Marseilles to Paris—Across the English Channel to London.
CHAPTER XXVIII 320 My First Visit to the Land of Wilberforce and Clarkson—Excursion on the Thames—Bank of England—Visited Towers of London—Beauchamp Tower With Its Sad Inscriptions—Arrival at New York—National Negro Business Men’s League Convention at Chicago—Booker T. Washington President—Many Talented Business Men in Attendance.
CHAPTER XXIX 327 Visit to President McKinley at Canton, Ohio—His Assassination at Buffalo—The Assassin Struck Down by James Parker—President’s Death—The Nation in Tears—A Christian Statesman—A Lover of Justice—Crucial Epochs of Our Country’s History, the Negro at the Fore.
CHAPTER XXX 336 President Roosevelt—His Imperial Honesty—Ex-Governor Jones, of Alabama—Advance of Justice in Our Country—Status a Half-Century Ago—Theodore Parker’s Arraignment—Eulogy by Ralph Waldo Emerson.  
CHAPTER XXXI 343 Booker T. Washington a Guest at the White House—Northern and Southern Press Comments—The Latter Not Typical of the Best Element of Southern Opinion.
CHAPTER XXXII 361 Washington City, the American Mecca—Ante-room at the White House—The Diary of an Office Seeker—William, the Innocent—William, the Croker—Colored People of the District of Columbia—Colored Press of the District.
CHAPTER XXXIII 269 Howard University—Public Schools—R. H. Terrell Appointed to a Judgship of the District—Unlettered Pioneers—Conclusions.  

ILLUSTRATIONS.

1. M. W. Gibbs Front.
2. Richard Allen 8
3. Wm. Lloyd Garrison 18
4. Frederick Douglass 32
5. Booker T. Washington 44
6. H. M. Turner 50
7. Geo. H. White 58
8. J. M. Langston 70
9. Abraham Lincoln 74
10. W. B. Derrick 80
11. Alexander Walters 92
12. H. P. Cheatham 104
13. Edward E. Cooper 118
14. Judson Lyons 128
15. Powell Clayton 140
16. P. B. S. Pinchback 149
17. A. H. Garland 158
18. J. A. Booker 172
19. I. G Ish 175
20. J. P. Green 183
21. P. L. Dunbar 199
22. B. K. Bruce 204
23. T. T. Fortune 210
24. W. A. Pledger 220
25. John C. Dancy 228
26. Abram Grant 253
27. J. E. Bush 263
28. J. P. Robinson 272
29. Martyrs 274
30. Chester W. Keatts 284
31. J. T. Settle 294
32. Justice Harlan 302
33. Charles W. Chestnut 312
34. William McKinley 327
35. James B. Parker 331
36. President Roosevelt 336
37. Secretary Cortelyou 341
38. W. Calvin Chase 367
39. R. H. Terrill 370

 


 

THE NEGRO IN THE SOUTH

Being the William Levi Bull
Lectures for the Year 1907

By Booker T. Washington And W.E. Burghardt Dubois

CONTENTS

I. The Economic Development of the Negro Race in Slavery
By Booker T. Washington
7
II. The Economic Development of the Negro Race since its Emancipation
By Booker T. Washington
43
III. The Economic Revolution in the South
By W.E. Burghardt DuBois
77
IV. Religion in the South
By W.E. Burghardt DuBois
123
  Notes to Chapters III and IV 193

 


 

THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK

By W.E.B. Du Bois

 

CONTENTS

CHAPTER  
  The Forethought
I.   Of Our Spiritual Strivings
II.   Of the Dawn of Freedom
III.   Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others
IV.   Of the Meaning of Progress
V.   Of the Wings of Atalanta
VI.   Of the Training of Black Men
VII.   Of the Black Belt
VIII.   Of the Quest of the Golden Fleece
IX.   Of the Sons of Master and Man
X.   Of the Faith of the Fathers
XI.   Of the Passing of the First-Born
XII.   Of Alexander Crummell
XIII.   Of the Coming of John
XIV.   Of the Sorrow Songs
  The Afterthought

 


 

DARKWATER

Voices from within the Veil

By W.E.B. Du Bois

CONTENTS

  POSTSCRIPT
  Credo
I THE SHADOW OF YEAR
  A Litany at Atlanta
II THE SOULS OF WHITE FOLK
  The Riddle of the Sphinx
III THE HANDS OF ETHIOPIA
  The Princess of the Hither Isles
IV OF WORK AND WEALTH
  The Second Coming
V “THE SERVANT IN THE HOUSE”
  Jesus Christ in Texas
VI OF THE RULING OF MEN
  The Call
VII THE DAMNATION OF WOMEN
  Children of the Moon
VIII THE IMMORTAL CHILD
  Almighty Death
IX OF BEAUTY AND DEATH
  The Prayers of God
X THE COMET
  A Hymn to the Peoples

 


 

THE QUEST OF THE SILVER FLEECE

By W.E.B. Du Bois

1911

CONTENTS

  Note from the Author
One DREAMS
Two THE SCHOOL
Three MISS MARY TAYLOR
Four TOWN
Five ZORA
Six COTTON
Seven THE PLACE OF DREAMS
Eight MR. HARRY CRESSWELL
Nine THE PLANTING
Ten MR. TAYLOR CALLS
Eleven THE FLOWERING OF THE FLEECE
Twelve THE PROMISE
Thirteen MRS. GREY GIVES A DINNER
Fourteen LOVE
Fifteen REVELATION
Sixteen THE GREAT REFUSAL
Seventeen THE RAPE OF THE FLEECE
Eighteen THE COTTON CORNER
Nineteen THE DYING OF ELSPETH
Twenty THE WEAVING OF THE SILVER FLEECE
Twenty-one THE MARRIAGE MORNING
Twenty-two MISS CAROLINE WYNN
Twenty-three THE TRAINING OF ZORA
Twenty-four THE EDUCATION OF ALWYN
Twenty-five THE CAMPAIGN
Twenty-six CONGRESSMAN CRESSWEL
Twenty-seven THE VISION OF ZORA
Twenty-eight THE ANNUNCIATION
Twenty-nine A MASTER OF FATE
Thirty THE RETURN OF ZORA
Thirty-one A PARTING OF WAYS
Thirty-two ZORA’S WAY
Thirty-three THE BUYING OF THE SWAMP
Thirty-four THE RETURN OF ALWYN
Thirty-five THE COTTON MILL
Thirty-six THE LAND
Thirty-seven THE MOB
Thirty-eight ATONEMENT

 


 

THE NEGRO

By W.E.B. Du Bois

 

CONTENTS

I AFRICA
II THE COMING OF BLACK MEN
III ETHIOPIA AND EGYPT
IV THE NIGER AND ISLAM
V GUINEA AND CONGO
VI THE GREAT LAKES AND ZYMBABWE
VII THE WAR OF RACES AT LAND’S END
VIII AFRICAN CULTURE
IX THE TRADE IN MEN
X THE WEST INDIES AND LATIN AMERICA
XI THE NEGRO IN THE UNITED STATES
XII THE NEGRO PROBLEMS
  SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING

MAPS

The Physical Geography of Africa
Ancient Kingdoms of Africa
Races in Africa
Distribution of Negro Blood, Ancient and Modern

 


 

THE SUPPRESSION OF THE AFRICAN SLAVE-TRADE
TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

1638-1870

Volume I, Harvard Historical Studies

1896

 

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I
Introductory
1. Plan of the Monograph 9
2. The Rise of the English Slave-Trade 9
 
CHAPTER II
The Planting Colonies
3. Character of these Colonies 15
4. Restrictions in Georgia 15
5. Restrictions in South Carolina 16
6. Restrictions in North Carolina 19
7. Restrictions in Virginia 19
8. Restrictions in Maryland 22
9. General Character of these Restrictions 23
 
CHAPTER III
The Farming Colonies
10. Character of these Colonies 24
11. The Dutch Slave-Trade 24
12. Restrictions in New York 25
13. Restrictions in Pennsylvania and Delaware 28
14. Restrictions in New Jersey 32
15. General Character of these Restrictions 33
 
CHAPTER IV
The Trading Colonies
16. Character of these Colonies 34
17. New England and the Slave-Trade 34
18. Restrictions in New Hampshire 36
19. Restrictions in Massachusetts 37
20. Restrictions in Rhode Island 40
21. Restrictions in Connecticut 43
22. General Character of these Restrictions 44
 
CHAPTER V
The Period of the Revolution, 1774–17876
23. The Situation in 1774 45
24. The Condition of the Slave-Trade 46
25. The Slave-Trade and the “Association” 47
26. The Action of the Colonies 48
27. The Action of the Continental Congress 49
28. Reception of the Slave-Trade Resolution 51
29. Results of the Resolution 52
30. The Slave-Trade and Public Opinion after the War 53
31. The Action of the Confederation 56
 
CHAPTER VI
The Federal Convention, 1787
32. The First Proposition 58
33. The General Debate 59
34. The Special Committee and the “Bargain” 62
35. The Appeal to the Convention 64
36. Settlement by the Convention 66
37. Reception of the Clause by the Nation 67
38. Attitude of the State Conventions 70
39. Acceptance of the Policy 72
 
CHAPTER VII
Toussaint L’Ouverture and Anti-Slavery Effort, 1787–1807
40. Influence of the Haytian Revolution 74
41. Legislation of the Southern States 75
42. Legislation of the Border States 76
43. Legislation of the Eastern States 76
44. First Debate in Congress, 1789 77
45. Second Debate in Congress, 1790 79
46. The Declaration of Powers, 1790 82
47. The Act of 1794 83
48. The Act of 1800 85
49. The Act of 1803 87
50. State of the Slave-Trade from 1789 to 1803 88
51. The South Carolina Repeal of 1803 89
52. The Louisiana Slave-Trade, 1803–1805 91
53. Last Attempts at Taxation, 1805–1806 94
54. Key-Note of the Period 96
 
CHAPTER VIII
The Period of Attempted Suppression, 1807–18257
55. The Act of 1807 97
56. The First Question: How shall illegally imported Africans be disposed of? 99
57. The Second Question: How shall Violations be punished? 104
58. The Third Question: How shall the Interstate Coastwise Slave-Trade be protected? 106
59. Legislative History of the Bill 107
60. Enforcement of the Act 111
61. Evidence of the Continuance of the Trade 112
62. Apathy of the Federal Government 115
63. Typical Cases 120
64. The Supplementary Acts, 1818–1820 121
65. Enforcement of the Supplementary Acts,1818–1825 126
 
CHAPTER IX
The International Status of the Slave-Trade, 1783–1862
66. The Rise of the Movement against the Slave-Trade,1788–1807 133
67. Concerted Action of the Powers, 1783–1814 134
68. Action of the Powers from 1814 to 1820 136
69. The Struggle for an International Right of Search, 1820–1840 137
70. Negotiations of 1823–1825 140
71. The Attitude of the United States and the State of the Slave-Trade 142
72. The Quintuple Treaty, 1839–1842 145
73. Final Concerted Measures, 1842–1862 148
 
CHAPTER X
The Rise of the Cotton Kingdom, 1820–1850
74. The Economic Revolution 152
75. The Attitude of the South 154
76. The Attitude of the North and Congress 156
77. Imperfect Application of the Laws 159
78. Responsibility of the Government 161
79. Activity of the Slave-Trade,1820–1850 163
 
CHAPTER XI
The Final Crisis, 1850–18708
80. The Movement against the Slave-Trade Laws 168
81. Commercial Conventions of 1855–1856 169
82. Commercial Conventions of 1857–1858 170
83. Commercial Convention of 1859 172
84. Public Opinion in the South 173
85. The Question in Congress 174
86. Southern Policy in 1860 176
87. Increase of the Slave-Trade from 1850 to 1860 178
88. Notorious Infractions of the Laws 179
89. Apathy of the Federal Government 182
90. Attitude of the Southern Confederacy 187
91. Attitude of the United States 190
 
CHAPTER XII
The Essentials in the Struggle
92. How the Question Arose 193
93. The Moral Movement 194
94. The Political Movement 195
95. The Economic Movement 195
96. The Lesson for Americans 196
 
APPENDICES
A. A Chronological Conspectus of Colonial and State Legislation restricting the African Slave-Trade, 1641–1787 199
B. A Chronological Conspectus of State, National, and International Legislation, 1788–1871 234
C. Typical Cases of Vessels engaged in the American Slave-Trade, 1619–1864 306
D. Bibliography 316
 
  INDEX 347

 


 

THE NEGRO IN THE SOUTH

Being the William Levi Bull
Lectures for the Year 1907

By Booker T. Washington

Of the Tuskeegee Normal and Industrial Institute

and

W.E. Burghardt Dubois

Of the Atlanta University

CONTENTS

I. The Economic Development of the Negro Race in Slavery
By Booker T. Washington
7
II. The Economic Development of the Negro Race since its Emancipation
By Booker T. Washington
43
III. The Economic Revolution in the South
By W.E. Burghardt DuBois
77
IV. Religion in the South
By W.E. Burghardt DuBois
123
  Notes to Chapters III and IV 193

 


 

OUR WORLD:

OR, THE SLAVEHOLDER’S DAUGHTER.

By F. Colburn Adams

1855.

CONTENTS

  PREFACE.
CHAPTER I. MARSTON’S PLANTATION.
CHAPTER II. HOW A NIGHT WAS SPENT ON MARSTON’S PLANTATION.
CHAPTER III. THINGS ARE NOT SO BRIGHT AS THEY SEEM.
CHAPTER IV. AN UNEXPECTED CONFESSION.
CHAPTER V. THE MAROONING PARTY.
CHAPTER VI. ANOTHER SCENE IN SOUTHERN LIFE.
CHAPTER VII. “BUCKRA-MAN VERY UNCERTAIN.”
CHAPTER VIII. A CLOUD OF MISFORTUNE HANGS OVER THE PLANTATION.
CHAPTER IX. WHO IS SAFE AGAINST THE POWER?
CHAPTER X. ANOTHER SHADE OF THE PICTURE.
CHAPTER XI. MRS. ROSEBROOK’S PROJECT.
CHAPTER XII. ELDER PEMBERTON PRAISEWORTHY CHANGES HIS BUSINESS.
CHAPTER XIII. A FATHER TRIES TO BE A FATHER.
CHAPTER XIV. IN WHICH THE EXTREMES ARE PRESENTED.
CHAPTER XV. A SCENE OF MANY LIGHTS.
CHAPTER XVI. ANOTHER PHASE OF THE PICTURE.
CHAPTER XVII. PLEASANT DEALINGS WITH HUMAN PROPERTY.
CHAPTER XVIII. A NOT UNCOMMON SCENE SLIGHTLY CHANGED.
CHAPTER XIX. THEY ARE ALL GOING TO BE SOLD.
CHAPTER XX. LET US FOLLOW POOR HUMAN NATURE TO THE MAN SHAMBLES.
CHAPTER XX. A FATHER’S TRIALS.
CHAPTER XXI. WE CHANGE WITH FORTUNE.
CHAPTER XXII. THE VICISSITUDES OF A PREACHER.
CHAPTER XXIII. HOW WE MANUFACTURE POLITICAL FAITH.
CHAPTER XXIV. MR. M’FADDEN SEES SHADOWS IN THE FUTURE.
CHAPTER XXV. HOW THEY STOLE THE PREACHER.
CHAPTER XXVI. COMPETITION IN HUMAN THINGS.
CHAPTER XXVII. THE PRETTY CHILDREN ARE TO BE SOLD.
CHAPTER XXVIII. NATURE SHAMES ITSELF.
CHAPTER XXX. THE VISION OF DEATH HAS PAST.
CHAPTER XXXI. A FRIEND IS WOMAN.
CHAPTER XXXII. MARSTON IN PRISON.
CHAPTER XXXIII. VENDERS OF HUMAN PROPERTY ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ITS MENTAL CAPRICES.
CHAPTER XXXIV. A COMMON INCIDENT SHORTLY TOLD.
CHAPTER XXXV. THE CHILDREN ARE IMPROVING.
CHAPTER XXXVI. WORKINGS OF THE SLAVE SYSTEM.
CHAPTER XXXVII. AN ITEM IN THE COMMON CALENDAR.
CHAPTER XXXVIII. IN WHICH REGRETS ARE SHOWN OF LITTLE WORTH.
CHAPTER XXXIX. HOW WE SHOULD ALL BE FORGIVING.
CHAPTER XL. CONTAINING VARIOUS MATTERS.
CHAPTER XLI. NICHOLAS’S SIMPLE STORY.
CHAPTER XLII. HE WOULD DELIVER HER FROM BONDAGE.
CHAPTER XLIII. OTHER PHASES OF THE SUBJECT.
CHAPTER XLIV. HOW DADDY BOB DEPARTED.
CHAPTER XLV. HOW SLAVEHOLDERS FEAR EACH OTHER.
CHAPTER XLVI. SOUTHERN ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE.
CHAPTER XLVII. PROSPERITY THE RESULT OF JUSTICE.
CHAPTER XLVIII. IN WHICH THE FATE OF FRANCONIA IS SEEN.
CHAPTER XLIX. IN WHICH IS A SAD RECOGNITION.
CHAPTER L. IN WHICH A DANGEROUS PRINCIPLE IS ILLUSTRATED.
CHAPTER LI. A CONTINUATION OF THE LAST CHAPTER.
CHAPTER LII. IN WHICH ARE PLEASURES AND DISAPPOINTMENTS.
CHAPTER LIII. A FAMILIAR SCENE, IN WHICH PRINGLE BLOWERS HAS BUSINESS.
CHAPTER LIV. IN WHICH ARE DISCOVERIES AND PLEASANT SCENES.
CHAPTER LV. IN WHICH IS A HAPPY MEETING, SOME CURIOUS FACTS DEVELOPED, AND CLOTILDA’S HISTORY DISCLOSED.
CHAPTER LVI. IN WHICH A PLOT IS DISCLOSED, AND THE MAN-SELLER MADE TO PAY THE PENALTY OF HIS CRIMES.

 


 

THE JOURNAL OF NEGRO HISTORY

VOL. I., No. 1 JANUARY, 1916

Edited By Carter G. Woodson

 

CONTENTS

Carter G. WoodsonThe Negroes of Cincinnati Prior to the Civil War W. B. HartgroveThe Story of Maria Louise Moore and Fannie M. Richards Monroe N. WorkThe Passing Tradition and the African Civilization A. O. StaffordThe Mind of the African Negro as reflected in his Proverbs Documents:

  • What the Negro was thinking during the Eighteenth Century.
  • Letters showing the Rise and Progress of the early Negro Churches of Georgia and The West Indies.

Reviews of Books:

  • Steward’s Haitian Revolution;
  • Cromwell’s The Negro in American History;
  • Ellis’s Negro Culture in West Africa;
  • and Woodson’s The Education of the Negro Prior to 1861.

Notes

VOL. I., NO. 2, APRIL, 1916

CONTENTS

Kelly MillerThe Historic Background of the Negro Physician W. B. HartgroveThe Negro Soldier in the American Revolution C. G. WoodsonFreedom and Slavery in Appalachian America A. O. StaffordAntar, The Arabian Negro Warrior, Poet and Hero Documents:

  • Eighteenth Century Slaves As Advertised By Their Masters;
  • Learning a Modern Language;
  • Learning to Read and Write;
  • Educated Negroes;
  • Slaves in Good Circumstances;
  • Negroes Brought from The West Indies;
  • Various Kinds of Servants;
  • Negro Privateers and Soldiers Prior to The American Revolution;
  • Relations Between the Slaves and the British During The Revolutionary War;
  • Relations Between the Slaves And the French During The Colonial Wars;
  • Colored Methodist Preachers Among the Slaves;
  • Slaves in Other Professions;
  • Close Relations of the Slaves and Indentured Servants.

Reviews of Books:

  • Dubois’s The Negro;
  • Roman’s The American Civilization and the Negro;
  • Henry’s The Police Control of the Slave in South Carolina;
  • Steward and Steward’s Gouldtown.

Notes How The Public Received The Journal Of Negro History Various Letters and Reviews

VOL. I., NO. 3, JUNE, 1916

CONTENTS

John H. Russell, Ph.D.Colored Freemen as Slave Owners in Virginia John H. Paynter, A.M.The Fugitives of the Pearl Benjamin BrawleyLorenzo Dow Louis R. MehlingerThe Attitude Of The Free Negro Toward African Colonization Documents:

  • Transplanting Free Negroes to Ohio From 1815 to 1858:
    • Blacks and Mulattoes,
    • New Style Colonization,
    • Freedom in a Free State,
    • The Randolph Slaves,
    • The Republic of Liberia.
  • A Typical Colonization Convention:
    • Convention of Free Colored People,
    • Emigration of the Colored Race,
    • Circular, Address to the Free Colored People of the State of Maryland,
    • Proceedings of the Convention of Free Colored People of the State of Maryland

Reviews of Books:

  • Abel’s The Slaveholding Indians. Volume I: As Slaveholder and Secessionist;
  • George’s The Political History of Slavery in the United States;
  • Clark’s The Constitutional Doctrines of Justice Harlan;
  • Thompson’s Reconstruction in Georgia, Economic, Social, Political, 1865–1872

Notes

VOL. I., NO. 4, OCTOBER, 1916

CONTENTS

C. E. PierreThe Work of The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts among the Negroes in the Colonies Alice Dunbar-NelsonPeople of Color in Louisiana, Part I William T. McKinneyThe Defeat of the Secessionists in Kentucky in 1861 J. Kunst:

  • Notes on Negroes in Guatemala During the Seventeenth Century;
  • A Mulatto Corsair of the Sixteenth Century

Documents:

  • Travelers’ Impressions of Slavery in America from 1750 to 1800:
    • Burnaby’s View of the Situation in Virginia;
    • General Treatment of Slaves Among the Albanians–Consequent Attachment of Domestics.–Reflections on Servitude by an American Lady;
    • Impressions of an English Traveler;
    • Abbé Robin on Conditions in Virginia;
    • Observations of St. John De Crèvecoeur;
    • Impressions of Johann D. Schoepf;
    • Extracts from Anburey’s Travels Through North America;
    • Vindication of The Negroes: A Controversy;
    • Sur L’état Général, Le Genre D’industrie, Les Moeurs, Le Caractère, Etc. Des Noirs, Dans Les États-unis;
    • Slavery as Seen by Henry Wansey;
    • Esclavage Par La Rochefoucauld-liancourt;
    • Observations Sur L’esclavage Par La Rochefoucauld-liancourt;
    • What Isaac Weld Observed in Slave States;
    • John Davis’s Thoughts on Slavery;
    • Observations of Robert Sutcliff;
  • Some Letters of Richard Allen and Absalom Jones to Dorothy Ripley;
    • Letter from an African Minister, Resident in Philadelphia Addressed to Dorothy Ripley.
    • Letter from an African, resident in Philadelphia, to Dorothy Ripley

Reviews of Books:

  • Clayton’s The Aftermath of the Civil War, in Arkansas;
  • Evans’s Black and White in the Southern States;
  • Sayers’s Samuel Coleridge-Taylor–Musician. His Life and Letters;
  • Bailey’s Race Orthodoxy in the South and Other Aspects of the Negro Problem;

Notes

INDEX TO VOLUME I.

Abel, A. H. II, The Slaveholding Indians of, reviewed, 339
African Mind, The, 42
Aftermath of the Civil War, The, reviewed, 444
Albany,
   a state convention of Colored people at, 293;
   slavery at, 400
Allen, Richard, letter of, 436
American Colonization Society opposed by free Negroes, 276
American lady, an, on the treatment of slaves, 400
Anburey, travels through North America, quoted, 407
Anderson, Martha E., a teacher in Ohio, 19
Andrew, one of the first Negroes to teach in Charleston, 352
Angus, Judith, the will of, 238
Antar, the Arabian Negro Warrior, Poet and Hero, 151
Arming the slaves,
   urged in South Carolina, 121;
   in Virginia, 119;
   in Rhode Island, 119;
   in Massachusetts, 120;
   in New York, 120
Astor, John Jacob, grandson of, aided slaves to purchase freedom, 252
Attitude of the Free People of Color toward African Colonization, 276
Auchmutty, Rev. Mr., took up the work of Elias Neau, 358
Augusta, Dr. A. T.,
   studied medicine at Toronto, 105;
   surgeon in the Civil War, 107
Augusta, Negroes at the siege of, 117

Bacon, Rev. Thomas, favored the instruction of Negroes, 350
Ball, Thomas, a colored photographer, 20
Baltimore, George, on colonization, 297
Baltimore,
  meeting to protest against African colonization, 279;
  another colonization meeting in 1831, 238;
  a divided meeting, 298;
  A Typical Colonization Meeting, 318
Bancroft, tribute to Negro troops, 129
“Baptists, Emancipating,” 143
Barclay, Rev. T., instructed Negroes at Albany, 358
Bartow, Rev. Mr., baptized Negroes, 355
Beckett, Rev. Mr., instructed Negroes, 355
Beech, Rev. J., baptized Negroes, 359
Beecham, Mrs., teacher of Negroes in Fredericksburg, 24
Beecher, Henry Ward, aided slaves to purchase freedom, 254
Berea College in anti-slavery centre, 149
Bienville,
  exchanged Indians for Negroes, 362;
  code of, 365;
  Negro troops under, 371
Bigham, J. A., review of Du Bois’s The Negro, 217
Birney, James G., editor of The Philanthropist destroyed by mob, 8
Black and White in the Southern States, reviewed, 437
Black Laws of Ohio, 2, 3, 4;
  repeal of 16
Black master, the existence of, 235-236
Blackburn, Miss Lucy, taught in Cincinnati, 19
Border States, position of, in 1861, 371
Boré, de Etienne,
  learned to granulate sugar, 375;
  the effects of the discovery, 375-376
Boston, anti-colonization meetings at, 284, 292
Bowen, Nathaniel, on colonization, 298
Boyd, Henry, a successful Negro business man prior to 1860, 21
Brawley, Benjamin, Lorenzo Dow, 265
Bray, Rev. Thomas, work of,
  among Negroes, 353-354;
  “The Associates” of, 354
“Breckinridge Democrats,” in control of Kentucky, 379
Breckinridge, John, views of, 377, 378, 379
Breacroft, Dr., appeal of, in behalf of the enlightenment of the Negroes, 352
Brissot de Warville, J. P., on the condition of the slaves, 419
Brooklyn, anti-colonization meeting of, 285
Brown County, Ohio, Negroes in, 302
Brown, William Wells, an occasional physician, 106
Bryan, Andrew, letters of, 87
Buckner, S. B., joined the Confederates, 390

Calhoun, John C., refuted by Dr. James McCune Smith, 104
Casas, De las, on slavery, 361-362
Casey, Wm. R., a teacher, 19
Casor, John, a slave, 234
Cesar, cure of, 101-102
Channing, offered to aid the defense of Daniel Drayton, 251
Charleston, missionary efforts at,
  among Negroes, 350-352;
  attitude of Negroes of, toward colonization, 280-281
Charlton, Rev. Mr., a teacher of Negroes in New York, 358
Chase, Salmon P., desired to aid Daniel Drayton, 251
Chastellux, Marquis de,
  his observations of Negro troops, 128
  critical examination of the travels of, 419
Chatham, the attitude of the Negroes of, toward colonization, 300
Chickasaws, fought with Negroes in Louisiana, 370
Chouchas, fought with Negroes in Louisiana, 369, 370
Choctaws, Negroes’ troubles with, in Louisiana, 371
Cimarrones, in Guatemala, 393-394
Cincinnati,
  The Negroes of, Prior to 1861, 1;
  Lane Seminary students opposed slavery, 7-8, 10-11, 12;
  Negro churches of, 11
  progress of the Negroes of, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13;
  anti-colonization meetings of, 289, 293, 294;
  Negroes excluded from public schools of, 17-18
Clark, F. B., The Constitutional Doctrines of Justice Harlan, 342
Clark, Jonathan, letters of, 79, 82
Clark, Peter H., a teacher in Ohio, 19
Clay, Henry, asked to head the anti-slavery societies of Kentucky, 144
Clayton, Powell, The Aftermath of the Civil War of, reviewed, 444
Cleveland, anti-colonization meeting of, 292
Clinton, Sir Henry,
  appeal of, to Negroes, 116
  proclamation of, 116
Code Noir, quoted, 365
Coffin, Joshua, aided fugitives to Northwest Territory, 146
Colgan, Rev. Mr., taught Negroes in New York, 358
Colonization, African,
  opposed, 279;
  supported, 280-282
Color, People of, in Louisiana, 362
Colored Freemen as Slave Owners in Virginia, 233
Columbia, anti-colonization meeting of, 287
Columbus, Negroes of, opposed to colonization, 292, 293
Conrad, Rufus, a preacher in Ohio, 20
Cook, Rev. Joseph, letter of, 69
Cooke, Stephen, letter of, 77
Cookes, moved from Fredericksburg to Detroit, 26
Cooper, Phil, chattel of his free wife, 240
Corbic, W. J., a teacher of Ohio, 19
Cornish, Samuel, opposed colonization, 294
Cornwallis, Ft., garrisoned by Negroes, 117
Corsair, a mulatto, 397
Creole, definition of, 366-368
Crittenden, John J.,
  advocated neutrality, 383;
  letter of, to General Scott, 387
Crittenden, Thomas L., stood with the Union, 391
Cromwell, John W., The Negro in American History of, reviewed, 94
Crozat, Anthony, traffic of, in slaves, 362
Crummell, Alexander, on colonization, 296
Cutler, Rev. Dr., admitted Negroes to his congregation at Boston, 359

Dabney, Austin, remarkable soldier and man, 129-131
Dahomey, speech of the king of, 65
D’Alone, a supporter of Dr. Bray, 353
Davis, Garrett, letter of, to General MeClellan, 381
Davis, John, thoughts on slavery, 434
Dayton, meeting at, to promote colonization, 298
De Baptiste, Richard,
  attended school at Fredericksburg, 22;
  moved to Detroit, 22; a preacher, 29
Debern, Magdelaine, lawsuit of, 366
De Grasse, John V., student at Bowdoin, 105
Delany, M. R.,
  studied at Harvard, 105;
  physician at Pittsburgh, 106;
  news on African colonization, 296;
  sent to Africa, 300
Depression of Louisiana, 375-376.
Derham, James, a Negro physician, 103
Detroit, attitude of,
  toward Negroes, 27;
  the question of fugitives in, 27;
  measures unfavorable to colored people, 28;
  progress of the Negroes of, 29
Diggs, Judson, betrayed the fugitives of the Pearl, 247
Don Quixote, quoted, 43
Dorsey, Thomas, opposed colonization, 282
Dotty, Duane, Miss Fannie M. Richards’s first superintendent of
  schools, 31
Douglass, Frederick,
  opposed to colonization, 295;
  controversy of, with the National Council, 300
Dove, Dr., owner of James Derham, 103
Dow, Lorenzo,
  journeys of, 266;
  writings of, discussed, 271;
  attitude of, toward slavery, 273
Drayton, Daniel, in charge of the Pearl, 245
Drummond, Henry, quoted, 42
Du Bois, The Negro of, reviewed, 217
Dunbar-Nelson, Alice, People of Color in Louisiana of, 361
Dunmore, Lord, issued proclamation of freedom to loyal Negroes, 115
Dyson, Walter,
  review of, of Ellis’s Negro Culture in West Africa, 95;
  of Gouldtown, 221

East, the attitude of, toward the West, 119
Edmondson children, the, 243; family tree of, 261
Edmondson, Hamilton, sold in New Orleans, 253
Edmondson, Richard, heroic efforts of, 248
Edmondson, Samuel, married Delia Taylor, 256
Education of the Negroes in Cincinnati, 6, 10
Education, The, of the Negro Prior to 1861, reviewed, 96
Edwards, Mrs., taught Negroes in South Carolina, 350-351
Effect of slaveholding in Louisiana, 368
Eighteenth Century Slaves as advertised by their Masters, 163
Ellis, Geo. W., Negro Culture in West Africa of, reviewed, 95
Emancipating Baptists in Kentucky, 143
Emancipation, the, and the arming of slaves, urged, 119
English, Chester, sailor on the Pearl, 246
Enlisting Negroes in the American Revolution, 112, 113, 114;
  considered by a council of war, 114;
  urged and allowed, 117
Ermana, a slave owned by her husband, 241
Erroneous opinions concerning the Negro, 34
Essadi Abdurrahman, a writer of the Sudan, 41
Essays on Negro slavery, 49, 54
Established Church of England, the ministrations of, 349
Ethiopia, ruled Egypt, 37
Evans, M. S., Black and White in Southern States of, reviewed, 437

Fausett, Jessie, review of,
  of T. G. Steward’s Haitian Revolution, 93;
  of A. H. Abel’s The Slaveholding Indians, 339
Ferguson, Joseph, a physician, 103
Fleet, Dr., educated in Washington, 105
Fleetwood, Bishop, urged the proselyting of Negroes, 350
Foote, John P., his opinion of Negroes, 19
Foote, Senator, effect of the speech of, at the Louis-Phillipe
  celebration, 245
Foster, James, opposed to colonization, 290
Free Negroes,
  power of, to manumit limited, 241-242;
  transplanted to free soil, 302;
  litigation concerning, in Louisiana, 368;
  aristocracy of, 395
Free Soilers attacked “Black Laws” of Ohio, 16
Freedman, a rich one of Guatemala, 395
Freedom in a Free State, 311
“Friends of Humanity” organized in Kentucky, 144
Frink, Rev. Mr., toiled among Negroes of Augusta, 354
Fugitives,
  going to the Northwest Territory, 1;
  from British territory to Michigan, 27
Fugitives of the Pearl, The, 243
Fuller, Betsey, owned her husband, 241

Gage, Thomas, quoted, on Negroes in Guatemala, 392-398
Gaines, John L., secured writ to obtain fund for colored schools, 17
Galvez, Governor of Louisiana, who employed Negro troops, 374
Garden, Commissary, opened a colored school in Charleston, 352
Garrison, Wm. L., effects of the radicalism of, 146
Gazzan, Dr. Joseph, teacher of M. R. Delany, 106
Gens de couleur libres, 365-366
George, James Z., The. Political History of Slavery of, reviewed, 340
Georgia,
  rise and progress of Negro Churches, 69;
  Negroes with the British in, 116, 117;
  Reconstruction in Georgia, reviewed, 343;
  missionary work in, 354
Germans,
  crowded the Negroes out in Cincinnati, 5;
  in Appalachian America, 133-134
Gibson, Bishop, address of, in behalf of Negroes, 352
Giddings, Joshua, motion for an inquiry into the detention of fugitives,
  250-251
Gilmore High School founded, 19
Goldsmith, Samuel, deposition of, 234
Gordon, Robert, a successful business man, 21-22
Gordon, Virginia Ann, daughter and heir of Robert Gordon, 22
Graydon, referred to Negro troops, 129
Greeks, acquainted with Ethiopia, 39
Greene, General, learned that the British would enlist Negroes, 115
Grimké, Thomas, letter of, referred to, 281
Gromes, Frank, purchased his relatives, 239
Guy, Rev. Mr., baptized Negroes in South Carolina, 352

Haigue, Mrs., taught Negroes in South Carolina, 351
Haitian Revolution, The, reviewed, 93
Hale, Senator, offered resolutions concerning the fugitives of the Pearl,
  251
Hall, Rev. C., admitted Negroes to his church in North Carolina, 353
Hamilton, Alexander,
  urged the emancipation and arming of slaves, 118;
  letter of, on conditions in South Carolina, 121
Hancock, John, member of the committee that opposed the enlistment of
  Negroes,–
Hanson, Roger W., went with the South, 390
Harlan, J. M., Constitutional Doctrines of, reviewed, 342
Harlan, Robert, once a man of considerable wealth, 20
Harris, Dr., opinion of, of Negro troops, 128
Harry, one of the first Negro teachers in America, 352
Hartford, anti-slavery meeting at, 286
Hartgrove, W. B., The Negro Soldier in the American Revolution of, 110
Hawkins, Peter, emancipated slaves, 240
Healing art among Negroes, 101-102
Henrico County, Virginia, records, 237
Henry, H. M., Police Control of the Slave in South Carolina of, reviewed,
  219
Henry, Patrick, influence of, in the uplands, 138
Hildreth, Richard, offered Daniel Drayton aid, 251
Hill, James H., statement of, 239
Historic Background of the Negro Physician, 99
Holly, James Theodore, position on African colonization, 300
Honyman, Rev. Mr., had Negroes in his congregation, 360
Hopkins, Samuel, urged the emancipation and arming of slaves, 118
How the Public received the Journal of Negro History, 225
Howe, Samuel, offered aid to Daniel Drayton, 251
Hubbard, Dr., a friend of Negro education, 107
Huddlestone, Rev. Mr., a successor of Neau, 358
Humboldt, Alex. Von, Observations on Negroes, 393
Hunt, Rev. Mr., had a Negro under probation, 352
Huntsville, Alabama, Negroes of, for colonization, 282
Husting Court of Richmond, a lawsuit in, to obtain freedom, 238

Iben Khaldun, a writer of Arabia, quoted, 39
Illinois, attitude of Negroes in, toward colonization, 300
Immigration of Negroes into Ohio, 2, 4; opposition to, aroused, 4
Impressions of an English traveler, 404
Indiana,
  Negroes took up land in, 8;
  attitude of Negroes of, toward African colonization, 300
Insurrections in Louisiana, 370, 376
Irish,
  crowded out the Negroes of Cincinnati, 5;
  the Scotch-Irish in the West, 133, 135
Iron first smelted by Negroes, 36-37

Jackson, George W., manager of Robert Gordon’s estate, 22
Jacob, R. T., offered resolutions for mediatorial neutrality, 384
Jefferson County, Ohio, free Negroes of, 304
Jefferson, Thomas, influence of, on frontier, 138
Jenny, Dr., worked among Negroes, 355
Johnson, Anthony, a Negro owning slaves, 234-236
Johnson, Jerome A., remembered Judson Diggs, 247
Johnson, Rev. Mr., baptized Negroes at Stratford, 359
Jones, Absalom,
  letter of, –;
  mentioned by Dow, 274;
  opposed colonization, 277
Jones, David A., deposition of, 238-239
Jones, S. Wesley, letter of, quoted, 281

Kearsley, John, master of James Derham, 103
Kemps Landing, Negroes in battle of, 115
Kench, Thomas, wanted Negroes in separate regiments, 120
Kentucky,
  “Emancipating Baptists” of, 143
  anti-slavery Presbyterians in, 143
  neutrality of, 383
  dangerous policy of, 385
Knight and Bell, Negro contractors in Cincinnati, 20
Kunst. J., Notes on the Negroes in Guatemala in the Seventeenth
  Century
, 392

Lannon, W. D., joined the Confederates, 390
Laurens, John, urged the arming of slaves, 118
Law, John, schemes of, 362-363
Lawrence County, Ohio, Negroes in, 4, 306
Lawrence, Samuel, Negroes under, behaved well, 112, 113
Lecky, tribute of, to Negro troops, 129
Lees, migrated to Detroit, 24, 26
Leile, George, letters of, 80, 81, 84
Lemoyne, Dr. Francis J., teacher of M. R. Delany, 106
Letters on slavery by a Negro, 60;
  letters showing the rise and progress of Negro Churches in Georgia
  and the West Indies, 69
Lewiston, Pennsylvania, anti-colonization meeting of, 287
Liberia, the Republic of, discussed, 313
Lincoln, a desire of, for the support of Kentucky, 377, 384
Lindsay, Rev. Mr., baptized Negroes in New Jersey, 355
Locke, Rev. Richard, baptized Negroes in Pennsylvania, 355
Longworth, Nicholas, aided colored schools of Cincinnati, 19
Louis-Philippe, the expulsion of, celebrated in Washington, 244
Louisiana,
  prostration of, 374-375;
  relieved somewhat by Negro refugees, 375
Lowth, Bishop, urged the conversion of Negroes, 350
Lundy, Benjamin, work of, in Tennessee, 145
Lutherans, in the West, 134
Lyell, Sir Charles, on the Negroes of Cincinnati, 18
Lyme, anti-colonization meeting of, 286

Madison, James, urged the emancipation and arming of slaves, 118
Magoffin, Governor, tried to aid the Secessionists in Kentucky, 382
Mann, Horace, offered to aid Daniel Drayton, 251
Manumission Society of Tennessee, 145
Marshall, Abraham, letters of, 77, 78, 85
Marshall, Humphrey, views of, 377, 384
Maryland, the enlistment of Negroes in, 120
Maryville, Tennessee, favorable to Negroes, 147-149
Massachusetts, arming the slaves in, 120
May, Samuel, helped to furnish defense for Daniel Drayton, 251
McSparran, conducted a class of Negroes, 359

 

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